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  • Fredrik Værslev«Tan Lines»; Exhibition view at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2017; Courtesy the artist, Andrew Kreps Gallery (New York), Gió Marconi (Milan) and STANDARD (Oslo); Photo: Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Gunnar Meier.
  • Fredrik Værslev«Tan Lines»; Exhibition view at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2017; Courtesy the artist, Andrew Kreps Gallery (New York), Gió Marconi (Milan) and STANDARD (Oslo); Photo: Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Gunnar Meier.
  • Fredrik Værslev «Tan Lines»; Exhibition view at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, 2017; Courtesy the artist, Andrew Kreps Gallery (New York), Gió Marconi (Milan) and STANDARD (Oslo); Photo: Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen, Gunnar Meier.

Itinerant solo show of Fredrik Vaerslev at Fondazione Giuliani

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to announce that next autumn will host an itinerant solo show for Norwegian artist Fredrik Vaerslev.
The show is currently at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen and will be at Kunstverrein Bonn before arriving to Fondazione Giuliani.

 

Fredrik Værslev (1979, lives in Drammen, Norway) has made an impression through his extensive painterly practice, which despite precise planning and execution always leaves space for coincidence. For example, he exposes his works to the weather, hangs his canvases on display on trees for months, or offers artist colleagues his own works for interventions. He thus celebrates a defined painterly gesture and carries the idea of appropriation to extremes.
 
At the Kunst Halle Værslev’s show, named “Tan Lines”, new work groups are being presented for the first time «Tan Lines».
The first includes canvases hanging in space, which face the second series of works on the wall as an installative whole. The second work group presented at the exhibition is composed of ‘Garden Paintings’, on which Værslev has been working intensely in recent years.

  • Yuri AncaraniThe Challenge, 2016; video, 67 min. Courtesy the artist.
  • Pauline Bourdy & Renate LorenzSilent, 2016 HD video; 7 min. 43 sec. Courtesy the artists, Centre d’Art Contemporain Genéve, Marcelle Alix, Paris, and Ellen de Bruijne Projects, Amsterdam.
  • Alessio Di ZioGenesee, 2016 video; 14 min. 11 sec. Courtesy the artist.
  • Jenna HasseSoltar, 2016 video; 23 min. 40 sec Courtesy Louise Productions.
  • Evangelia KraniotiSamba no Escuro, 2016 video; 50 min. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Sator, Paris.
  • Alessio Di ZioSioux Rapids, 2016 video; 15 min. 31 sec. Courtesy the artist.
  • Emilie JouvetAria, 2016 video; 60 min. Courtesy Emilie Jouvet.
  • Salomé LamasThe Burial of the Dead, 2016 HD video; 90 min. Courtesy the artist.
  • Boris MiticA Museum of Nothing(s), 2016, single-channel video; 60 min. Courtesy the artist.
  • Kerry TribeExquisite Corpse, 2016 installation video; 51 min. Courtesy the artist and 1301PE, Los Angeles.
  • Wu TsangDuilian, 2016 HD video; 26 min. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin.
  • Bodil FuruMangeurs de cuivre, 2016 video; 81 min. Courtesy the artist.

Biennale de l’Image en Mouvement: from Geneva to Rome

7 October 2017 > 7 January 2018

 

Fondazione Giuliani invites
Biennale de l’Image en Mouvement: from Geneva to Rome
curated by Andrea Bellini, Cecilia Alemani, Caroline Bourgeois, Elvira Dyangani Ose)

 

The Biennale de l’Image en Mouvement (BIM, Biennale of Moving Images), of the Centre d’Art Contemporain in Geneva, provides a platform for art and ideas by surveying the ever-shifting territories of moving images, while aiming to make sense of the extraordinary profusion of images that has progressively invaded all aspects of contemporary art. The originality of BIM resides in the fact that it consists exclusively of works commissioned and produced for each edition. As a site of research and production, rather than simply a temporary exhibition, BIM is one of the most interesting and dynamic realities in the arena of video art and cinema.

 

Conceived in its present form in 2014 by Andrea Bellini, BIM is a one of a kind hybrid event situated somewhere between a cinema festival, a constellation of solo exhibitions, and a research and production site. It brings together visual artists, film directors and performers, including dancers and musicians.

 

The latest edition of the Biennale was produced by the Centre d’Art Contemporain in Geneva in collaboration with partners that include the Faena Art Foundation in Buenos Aires, and the production house In Between Art Film in Rome. Thanks to this local reality, together with the Fondazione Giuliani, an important selection of works produced in 2016 will be presented in Rome for the first time at Palazzo delle Esposizioni.

  • Your Ruins Are My FlagInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, 2017; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagFontana delle Mani, 2017; 7' video, wood, water; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, 2017; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My Flag Installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, 2017; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagTake The World Into The World, 2017; Aleppo soap, Ytong block; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagHorizontal Aleppo, 2017; Aleppo soap, foam; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, 2017; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagTake The World Into The World, 2017; Aleppo soap, Ytong blocks; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagTake The World Into The World, 2017; Aleppo soap, Ytong block; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagVertical Aleppo, 2017; Aleppo soap, bricks; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagGive More Sky To The Flags, 2016; corten steel, rubble; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagTake The World Into The World, 2017; Aleppo soap, Ytong blocks; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagHaiku Under Tension, 2017; trampoline, rubble; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagTake The World Into The World, 2017; Aleppo soap, Ytong block; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagDisrupted Air (Still life), 2017; Spatifillum, newspapers; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagDisrupted Air (Still life), 2017; plants, newspapers; photo Giorgio Benni.
  • Your Ruins Are My FlagThe World Belongs to Those Who Set It On Fire, 2016; candle smoke on paper; photo Giorgio Benni.

Your Ruins Are My Flag

October 2017 > January 2018

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present the exhibition Your Ruins Are My Flag, by artist Mircea Cantor.
 

from October 13 2017 – January 27, 2018
 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present its upcoming exhibition, a solo show dedicated to artist Mircea Cantor.
 

In the artist’s imagination, poetic suggestions, tradition and spirituality coexist, generating evocative and metaphorical artworks that examine contemporary society with both a critical eye and optimistic viewpoint. Aware of the multiple meanings that words and objects can contain, Cantor playfully combines materials, media and languages ​​to produce pungent works where definitions and categories are constantly subverted. Suspended between profound formal and aesthetic research and their critical value, his works merge simple symbols and gestures to convey universal messages and propose parallel readings.

 

With this seemingly contradictory approach of cynicism and playfulness, the artist digs into the depths of contemporary history, revealing its inner contradictions. His language manipulates the different contexts of meaning, questioning boundaries, roles, and canons, and projecting the spectator into a dimension where the obvious is never taken for granted but has the power to change our perception of reality.

 

In Your Ruins Are My Flag a large body of new works specifically created for the show will be presented for the first time. As the title suggests, the exhibition focuses on a reflection on the concept of loss, in its myriad of multiple meanings: from heritage to tradition, the fragility of political and social equilibrium, to loss as a negation of freedom, innocence and security.

 

The materials that make up the artworks intertwine themselves in a vital and ambivalent relationship: some are used by the artist for the first time in his career (such as soap and the thermal camera), while adding additional elements to their interpretation. In this way, soap, far from being a mere substance that shapes the work, also recalls the act of washing away and eventual erasure of the past, of history, and its legacy. The operation is enriched with further suggestions when we discover that the soap used was produced following the ancient tradition of the city of Aleppo, a protagonist in some the saddest chronicles of today. The fragility of modern times is the backdrop of an exhibition, which challenges ideologies, conflicts and new threats that move the reins of contemporary history, but in a sublimated, poetic fashion.

 

Mircea Cantor was born in 1977 in Oradea, Romania; as he likes to say: “he lives and works in the world”. His most recent international solo shows include: The invisible party of the infinite, Galerie de l’atelier Brancusi Georges Pompidou, Paris, 2017; SOLO SHOW – Part I and Part II, Fondation Francès, Senlis, France, 2016; 5775, Dvir Gallery, Tel Aviv, 2015; Mircea Cantor: Collected Works, Rennie Collection at Wing Sang, Vancouver, 2014; Mircea Cantor: QED, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest, 2013; Mircea Cantor, Marcel Duchamp Prize 2011, Center Pompidou, Paris, 2012; Sic Transit Gloria Mundi, MACRO, Rome, 2012.

 

With the kind support of Magazzino, Rome; and with a very special thanks to Faurar Art, Baia Mare, Romania and Laurealep.

  • Mircea CantorTake The World Into The World, 2017

Prolonged Show

 

We are pleased to announce that the exhibition Your Ruins Are My Flag by artist Mircea Cantor, currently underway at the Giuliani Foundation, has been extended until January 27, 2018.

Consequences

 

Jay Heikes — Consequences
Language: EN / IT
Dimension: 190 x 260 mm
Colour
Pages: 80
Softcover
Editor: Jay Heikes
Authors: Adrienne Drake, Jay Heikes and Conny Purtill
Editorial Coordination: Costanza Paissan
Design: Walter Santomauro
Edition of 499 copies
Year: 2016

ISBN 978-88-99776-02-2
PRICE: 18€

 

The book Consequences is published in conjunction with the exhibition by Jay Heikes with contributions from Felix Culpa, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Ari Marcopoulos, Josiah McElheny, Todd Norsten, Conny Purtill, Justin Schlepp, Gedi Sibony, Michael Stickrod, The Unknown Artist, and the ghost of Lee Lozano, held at Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea, Rome, on 10 October – 12 December 2015.

The book includes a correspondence between Jay Heikes and Adrienne Drake about the collaborative process at the basis of the project, a series of “headnotes” by the artist on most of the exhibited works, a text by Conny Purtill and a visual mindmap by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer. The texts are accompanied by a large selection of installation views and images of the works, allowing the reader to delve into the visual, spatial and conceptual framework of the whole project.

James Lee Byars

 

THE GOLDEN TOWER
CAMPO SAN VIO, VENICE
13 MAY – 26 NOVEMBER 2017

Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, with the support of Michael Werner Gallery, is pleased to announce the presentation of James Lee Byars’s “The Golden Tower” in the Campo San Vio, Venice, on the edge of the Grand Canal.  This presentation is a Collateral Event of the 57th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia, curated by Christine Macel on view from 13 May – 26 November 2017.

Byars envisioned “The Golden Tower” as a colossal beacon and oracle that would bridge heaven and earth and unify humanity – a contemporary monument surpassing the grandeur of the Lighthouse of Alexandria. The idea of “The Golden Tower” first began in 1976 and was developed with numerous conceptual studies throughout the artist’s career. The work was first exhibited in 1990 at the GegenwartEwigkeit exhibition at Martin-Gropius-Bau, Berlin, and later in 2004 at the posthumous retrospective Life, Love and Death at the Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt. Towering to a height of over 20 meters, “The Golden Tower” is the artist’s largest and most ambitious work. The Venice installation of “The Golden Tower” is the first to fully realize the artist’s intentions of presenting the sculpture in a public space.

“The Tower gives shape to a symbol of ascension, taking metaphorical aim towards the sacred mountain – a gilded machine to honor the gods,” says curator Alberto Salvadori of the work. “The splendor of gold hints at the symbol of the sun but also becomes a symbol of inner illumination, of intellectual knowledge and spiritual experience. A concept of divinity. That’s the deeper motivation in James Lee Byars’s use of gold … it is the ultimate symbol of greatness and the infinite.”

Located in the Dorsoduro, between the Accademia and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, “The Golden Tower” will be visible throughout many areas of the city. The tower’s brilliant gilded surface echoes the golden mosaic façade of the adjacent Palazzo Barbarigo. Its placement in Campo San Vio will recall Canaletto’s famous view of the Grand Canal, painted from that same spot.

“James Lee conceived of ‘The Golden Tower’ as a monument to humanity,” says Wendy Dunaway, the artist’s widow. “Venice was both his home and a metaphor for East meeting West.  I can’t imagine a more fitting tribute in these times.”

The presentation of “The Golden Tower” in Venice, is also significant given Byars’s deep connections to the city. Byars lived off and on in Venice beginning in 1982. He worked closely with the master glass-blowers of Murano to realize his major 1989 sculpture, “The Angel”. Throughout his career Byars enacted numerous performances in Venice, including “The Holy Ghost”, Piazza San Marco, 1975; “The New Pink Flag of Italy”, also Piazza San Marco, 1980; and “The Death of James Lee Byars”, Punta della Dogana, 1993. Byars participated in four previous editions of the Biennale Arte, performing “Be Quiet” at the opening of the 39th International Art Exhibition and “The Poet of the Gondola” in the 1986 edition. Harald Szeemann included the sculpture “The Spinning Oracle of Delphi” in 1999 and three gilded marble sculptures were included in the Biennale Arte 2013.

About James Lee Byars

James Lee Byars was born in Detroit in 1932 and studied art and psychology at Wayne State University. He presented his first museum exhibition in 1958, a legendary event that took place in the stairwell of New York’s Museum of Modern Art and lasted only one day. Over the following decade Byars lived and worked in Japan where he presented many performances and exhibitions. In 1964 he was invited to present three performances at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Byars returned to America in 1967, dividing his time between New York and Los Angeles; by the 1970s he began to spend increasing amounts of time in Europe. Since that time Byars has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions worldwide, including Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Kunsthalle Düsseldorf; IVAM Centre del Carme, Valencia; Castello di Rivoli/Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Turin; The Henry Moore Institute, Leeds; and Fundaçao de Serralves, Porto.

Byars died in Cairo in 1997. Important posthumous exhibitions include The Epitaph of Con. Art is which Questions have Disappeared?, Kestner Gesellschaft, Hannover (1999); The Arts Club of Chicago (2000); Life Love and Death, Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt and Musée d’Art moderne et contemporain de Strasbourg (2004); The Perfect Silence, Whitney Museum of American Art (2005); I’m Full of Byars, Kunstmuseum Bern (2008); The Perfect Axis, Schloss Benrath, Düsseldorf; and Klein Byars Kapoor, Musée d’art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice and ARoS Kunstmuseum, Århus, Denmark (2012-2013).

Most recently MoMA PS1 in New York presented James Lee Byars: 1/2 an Autobiography, the most comprehensive survey of Byars organized in North America since the artist’s death in 1997. Organized in cooperation with Museo Jumex in Mexico City, where it debuted in spring 2013, the exhibition featured a selection of sculptures, fabric works, performable paper pieces, ink paintings, live performance and ephemera.

logo-57EIA-ev_coll-2017

  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, pigment, acrylic, gesso, string, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, pigment, acrylic, gesso, string, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, pigment, acrylic, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, pigment, acrylic, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, acrylic, pigment, gesso, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, acrylic, pigment, gesso, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, wooden stick, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, wooden stick, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, wooden stick, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, wooden stick, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, graphite, string, gesso, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, graphite, string, gesso, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, string, styrofoam, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, string, styrofoam,jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; silkscreen ink, adobe, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); silkscreen ink, adobe, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; silkscreen ink, adobe, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; adobe, oil, pigment, acrylic, gesso, string, canvas, linen, styrofoam, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); adobe, oil, pigment, acrylic, gesso, string, canvas, linen, styrofoam, jute, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017; oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, painters tape, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashUntitled, 2017 (detail); oil, pigment, acrylic, linen, painters tape, wood support; photo Jean Vong; Courtesy the artist, Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York, and Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
  • N. DashInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • N. DashVideo still, Installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni

N. Dash

9 May > 14 July 2017

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present the first institutional solo show in Europe by American artist N. Dash.

“The language [Arabic] is wonderful for Wanderwort*

One morning in class, [he] taught the word for “mud brick.” In ancient hieroglyphs it was djebet, which became tobe in Coptic, and then the Arabs, adding a definite article, made it al-tuba, which was brought to Spain as adobar, and then to the American Southwest, where this heavy thing, having been lugged across four millennia and seven thousand miles, finally landed as “adobe.””

Peter Hessler’s Letter from Cairo in The New Yorker April 17, 2017

*Wanderwort
Etymology – borrowed from German Wanderwort, from Wander (“wandering) + Wort (“word”)
Noun – A loanword that has spread to many different languages

  • Will BenedictThe Bed That Eats, 2015
  • Will BenedictThe Bed That Eats, 2015
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Will BenedictUntitled, 2014
  • Will Benedict & Tom HumphreysUntitled, 2014
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Will Benedict I AM A PROBLEM (Enemy Ladder), 2017
  • Will Benedict I AM A PROBLEM (Enemy Ladder), 2017
  • Will Benedict I AM A PROBLEM (Enemy Ladder), 2017
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Wolfgang Breuer No Title, 2011
  • Will BenedictI AM A PROBLEM (T.O.D.D.), 2016
  • Will BenedictI AM A PROBLEM (T.O.D.D.), 2016
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Will BenedictToilets not Temples, 2014
  • Will BenedictThe Leopard Frog, 2016
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Will BenedictLay's Miserables, 2017
  • Wil BenedictStop and Frisk, 2013
  • Fiction is a Terrible EnemyInstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2017, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Will BenedictProduction Hospital, 2016

Fiction is a Terrible Enemy

11 FEBRUARY > 8 APRIL 2017

 

Fiction is a Terrible Enemy

a solo show by Will Benedict

from 11th February to 8th April 2017

Law & Order was an American television program running on the NBC network for 19 years. It has been spun off and franchised into six American iterations, five video games, as well as French, British and Russian versions. In 2016 Donald Trump declared himself the Law and Order candidate. My friend Justine is always late, which is rather impolite. She could use some Law and Order in her life. Law and Order can simply be patronizing but at its worse can also be political shorthand for the imprisonment of millions of people.

For my exhibition at Fondazione Giuliani I will be premiering a new music video I made for the band Wolf Eyes called “I AM A PROBLEM (Enemy Ladder)”, along with a selection of movies and music videos made in the past few years. Last summer for the Berlin Biennial I made another music video for Wolf Eyes called “I AM A PROBLEM (T.O.D.D.)”, which features an alien being interviewed by Charlie Rose on the subject of immigration. This new “I AM A PROBLEM” video follows a SWAT team staked outside of a quiet family home where a woman is reading a book, oblivious to, or unconcerned about, the police activity outside her window. The book she is reading reveals dark secrets about our potential collective desire for a release from this corporeal world. I think.

In 1996 another friend of mine named Chris had a band called Razorburn 77. I don’t know why the band was called that. But they had a song called Law & Order that was just the theme song to the TV show Law & Order. It was funny at the time but also terrible. At about this time Bill Clinton had just instituted the Three Strikes Law, which was coined from the game of baseball and that sent any offender who had three felony convictions to life imprisonment no matter the severity of the crime. As it turned out, three strikes created a cruel, Kafkaesque criminal justice system that lost all sense of proportion. Shoplifting from a department store, pilfering change from a parked car, or passing a bad check could land you in prison for life. Fiction is a terrible enemy.

-Will Benedict

Will Benedict (born Los Angeles, 1978) is an artist living in Paris, France. His work has recently been included in the 9th Berlin Biennale (2016), the 10th Nicaragua Biennial (2016) and the 31st Biennial of Graphic Arts in Ljubljana (2015). Recent solo exhibitions include I AM A PROBLEM at Rob Tufnell in London (2016), Bad Weather at Overduin & Co. in Los Angeles (2015), A Bone in the Cheese at Bortolami in New York (2015), Corruption Feeds at Bergen Kunsthall in Norway (2014), Comparison Leads to Violence at Balice Hertling in Paris (2014), and The Narcissism of Minor Differences at Halle für Kunst in Lüneburg (2013). He has also curated the exhibitions Nuclear War: What’s in it for you? at Vilma Gold in London (2014), Vertical Club at Bortolami in New York (2013) and Commercial Psycho at Andrew Kreps Gallery in New York (2012).

Menti locali

November 2016 > April 2017

 

MENTI LOCALI: Ritorno a Spinaceto
a project by
Luigi Coppola and Davide Franceschini

in collaboration with “Ettore Majorana” High School

menti locali is a collaborative project between Fondazione Giuliani, visual artists and high schools, which activates the stories, communities and spaces of the urban periphery. It identifies teaching as a privileged position for the development of research and for the diffusion of contemporary culture, and sees schools as an acute observatory of the local area, with the ability to rethink the production and distribution of aesthetic experiences.

On this occasion, the Foundation, together with guest co-curator Cecilia Canziani, collaborated with the Ettore Majorana High School, inviting artists Luigi Coppola and Davide Franceschini to create a project together with the students, which began with an exploration of the neighbourhood Spinaceto and ended with the creation of a collective artwork.

menti locali: Ritorno a Spinaceto was produced by Fondazione Giuliani and MIBACT (Direzione Generale Arte e Architettura Contemporanee e Periferie Urbane), curated by Adrienne Drake and Cecilia Canziani, developed and coordinated by Luigi Coppola and Davide Franceschini in collaboration with the students of  Ettore Majorana High School: Michele Amicarelli, Riccardo Barboni, Martina Bovi, Martina Cacciola, Elisa Carpentieri, Francesco Cerqua, Giulia Colamarrtino, Alice Donatone, Amir Elnahss, Edoardo Fedeli, Giorgia Frigeri, Francesco Grossholz, Gabriele Lalli, Gabriele Lausdei, Giorgia Liberati, Beatrice Maiolatesi, Andrea Marcellini, Emma Palombelli, Valerio Parente, Diego Picucci, Camilla Pozzi, Giulia Quaglieri, Giacomo Tacconi, Mattia Talarico, Federico Tallarico, Maria Tisano, Emilia Trombetta, and coordinated for the high school by Patrizia Bucciarelli and Daniela D’Alia.

http://ritornoaspinaceto.blogspot.it

With thanks to:
Liceo Scientifico e Linguistico Ettore Majorana, Tre Pini Garden S.r.l., Grafiche Giorgiani (Castiglione D’Otranto – LE), Associazione “Per la Strada” di Spinaceto, CSOA Auro e Marco, Aula Studio Spinacity.

Liceo Scientifico e Linguistico Ettore Majorana
Via Carlo Avolio, 111 – 00128 Rome
www.liceomajorana.gov.it

MIBACT

  • Micol AssaëlSleeplessness, 2003-2004 (Courtesy Galleria Bonomo, Bari, photo Camilla Croce)

Upcoming exhibition

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to announce the upcoming group show In that memory all things nurse, curated by Adrienne Drake.

 

Opening Thursday 13th October

from 6.00 pm to 9.00 pm

 

from 14th October to 22nd December 2016

 

Fondazione Giuliani will be closed to the visitors until October 13th, while the staff will be back in the Foundation from September 1st. For any updates or information please contact us at info@fondazionegiuliani.org or +39 06 5730109.

Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paper

 

Edited by Mousse Publishing

2016

English and Italian

15,00€

 

Published on occasion of the cycle of exhibitions dedicated to the work of Giorgio Griffa (Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serralves, Porto; Bergen Kunsthall; and Fondazione Giuliani, Rome) this catalogue is an extension of the book Giorgio Griffa: Works 1965–2015.
Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paper is devoted to the graphic practice of the artist, and has been published in conjunction with the exhibition “Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paper”, curated by Andrea Bellini at Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea in Rome.

 

 

  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Stamen Papersinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni

Stamen Papers

26 May > 22 July 2016

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present its upcoming exhibition, a solo presentation by British artist Michael Dean.

from 26th May to 22nd July 2016

Michael Dean adopts different modes of expression in his work, involving sculpture, writing, performance and photography, often developed and united within text-based installations. The cornerstone to his research is a visual analysis of language that stems from the tradition of the written word. Multiple material configurations are developed and can present themselves as physical objects dominated by an apparent lightness that demystifies the weight and raw nature of the materials used: particularly concrete and steel. The complex spatiality of Dean’s theoretical and material investigation determines an inextricable relationship with the experience of the exhibition in physical space.

The Stamen Papers draw on a botanical vocabulary (the stamen is the pollen producing part of a flower, composed of filament and anther) for both the significance and structure of the installation that Dean has developed specifically for the spaces of Fondazione Giuliani. For Stamen Papers, his work health (Working Title) produced originally for his solo exhibition at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds in 2012 is installed as an anthered filament for a stamen based delivery of previous exhibition based pages.

The Pollen, a new work published on occasion of Stamen Papers will be available in diminishing form.

As of May 12th of this year Michael Dean was shortlisted for the Turner Prize 2016.

Michael Dean (born Newcastle upon Tyne, 1977) lives and works in London. In the fall of 2016, his solo show will open at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas, Texas. A selection of recent institutional exhibitions include: Sic Glyphs, South London Gallery (2016); Qualities of Violence, de Appel Arts Centre, Amsterdam and Jumping Bones, Extra City Kunstal, Antwerp (2015); HA HA HA HA HA HA, Kunst Forum Ludwig, Aachen, The Upper Room, David Zwirner (with Fred Sandback), London (2014); Arnolfini, Bristol (2013); Cubitt, London (2012); Henry Moore Institute, Leeds (2012). Group exhibitions include: Albert the Kid Is Ghosting, David Roberts Art Foundation, London and Sculptures Also Die, CCC Strozzina, Florence (2015); The Noing Uv It, Bergen Kunsthall, MIRRORCITY, The Hayward Gallery, London, Manners of Matter, Salzburg Kunstverein (2014); A History of Inspiration, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2013).

Sam Falls

 

Edited by NERO

2015

English/Italian

35,00€

 

The book documents the installation of Sam Falls at the Fondazione Giuliani, on display from 14 February to 18 April 2015. The works on display – in different mediums – explore ways of faithfully representing time and understanding it through art. For the American artist, time is elusive and the future is “filled with meaning” only when it becomes “now”. The present, divided between past and future, has the optimism of production and the melancholy of aging.

 

 

Fondazione Giuliani will be closed to the public from 13th December 2015 to 3rd February 2016.

  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 1968 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 1969 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 1969 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 1968 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 1968 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaPaper, 2015 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaCanone aureo 586, 2014 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)
  • Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paperinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2016, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Giorgio GriffaNumerazione, 1996 (Courtesy the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York)

Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paper

 

Giorgio Griffa: Works on Paper
curated by Andrea Bellini

from 5th February to 9th April 2016

The compulsion to repeat may manifest a lack of hope, but it seems to me that to continue to make the same thing over and over in order to arrive at different results is more than an exercise, it is the unique freedom to discover.                                                                                                                                                                                          Aldo Rossi, A Scientific Autobiography

On February 4th 2016, Fondazione Giuliani will present the first exhibition of Giorgio Griffa dedicated entirely to works on paper, curated by Andrea Bellini. The curator intends to highlight the significance of this aspect of the Turin-based artist’s practice, presenting around fifty-five works whose chronological arch spans from the end of the 1960s until today. Beginning in 1967 and continuing through to his most recent works, Griffa’s artistic research – one of the most important figures of Italian abstract painting and the neo-avant-garde – is based on three fundamental coordinates: rhythm, sequence and sign. A working methodology that the artist also consistently practices with drawing. As the artist himself maintains in an interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist (published in the exhibition’s catalogue), each drawing does not represent a “plan for a painting”, even if in many cases it provides ideas for later paintings, but instead constitutes an independent aspect of his work, a sort of parallel activity to painting. His delicate drawings and watercolours, often in different formats, express the power of his large canvases. Like those, they represent the constant verification of his visual language and its narrative and lyrical possibilities, expanding his repertoire without wanting to be definitive or closed exercises.

 What is universal about Griffa’s works on paper, and his paintings, is the idea of the “memory” of the sign, the desire to want to individuate and practice a simple gesture that man has known and repeated for at least thirty thousand years, ever since the Palaeolithic period. Paper ceases to be a receptacle of the finished image, a definitive place, and instead becomes a physical fragment of a discontinuous, expanding space. His working methodology is simple but rigorous: the artist chooses each time the elementary components of his intervention, a sort of protocol of the making of the work. Depending on the size of the paper and the material (graphite, Indian ink, watercolour) he needs to choose the length of his signs, and thus their rhythm and direction. The next thing to do is to decide on the “place” where these signs should start. Very often the artist begins to trace the signs starting from the top left, as one does with writing, but the work could also begin from right to left, or from bottom to top. The drawing does not invade the surface according to an overall plan, but is rather destined to fill the space slowly, following a direction, rhythm and chosen frequency. The drawing up of the traits takes place in a state that the artist himself refers to as “passive concentration”: his hand and mind follow the chosen protocol in a state of meditative concentration, almost like in a Zen exercise. In the exhibition at the Foundation, one can follow the entire development of Griffa’s work, from the most minimal period from the end of the 1960s to the 1970s, through the more decorative and free period of the 1980s, until the last twenty years, when he has begun works with numbers (dedicated to the golden ratio) and more complex gestures.

The exhibition is in collaboration with the Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva, Bergen Kunsthall, Norway, and the Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto. Two books have been published for the occasion by Mousse Publishing, Giorgio Griffa: 1965 – 2015 and Giorgio Griffa:  Works on Paper.

THE REGISTRY OF PROMISE

 

Edited by Roma Publications

2015

English/French

30,00€

 

Over the course of a year, The Registry of Promise consisted of four interrelated exhibitions, which are represented as chapters in this book. In these chapters, Chris Sharp reflects on our increasingly fraught relationship with what the future may or may not hold, and the work engages with and plays upon the various readings and mutability of promise, along with the inevitability of what may come, whether positive or negative. Such polyvalence is particularly topical, as we have shifted from the anthropocentric promise of modernity to a negative faith in the post-human. Richly illustrated with works and installation views, and an archive of previously published articles by Chris Sharp.

 

With: Becky Beasley, Patrick Bernatchez, Juliette Blightman, Peter Buggenhout, Nina Canell, Michael Dean, Alexander Gutke, Jochen Lempert, Jean-Luc Moulène, Marlie Mul, Matt Mullican, Rosalind Nashashibi, Antoine Nessi, Jean-Marie Perdrix, Reto Pulfer, Mandla Reuter, Hans Schabus, Lucy Skaer, Michael E. Smith, Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli, Francisco Tropa, Andy Warhol and Anicka Yi.

 

 

  • Pedro Cabrita ReisLa casa di Roma, 2015
  • Pedro Cabrita ReisLa casa di Roma, 2015
  • Pedro Cabrita ReisLa casa di Roma, 2015

Pedro Cabrita Reis – La Casa di Roma

 

With La casa di Roma, an artwork conceived for the project “L’Albero della cuccagna. Nutrimenti dell’arte” curated by Achille Bonito Oliva, artist Pedro Cabrita Reis has created a structure in Piazza MAXXI that follows the design principles of a sort of primordial architecture. A large rectangular volume made of bricks that makes reference, with its lack of finish, to its belonging to a universe of necessity, which characterizes many contemporary ruins that dot our suburbs.

Touching the first floor of the museum, as if it was the structure’s ideal pillar, the work carries a dual function that often accompanies spontaneous constructions: on the one hand it provides protection, on the other it acts as a possible foundation of other volumes.

As suggested by the artist, La casa di Roma speaks of an order in which the small and the weak support the larger, while its temporary nature works as the base of the museum and metaphorically puts in doubt its solidity.

Project promoted by the Fondazione Giuliani.

BOOK LAUNCH GIORGIO GRIFFA

Presentation 16 October 2015 at 9:30 am

Istituto Italiano di Cultura, 39 Belgrave Square, London

 

Published by Mousse on the occasion of the cycle of exhibitions dedicated to Giorgio Griffa at Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; Bergen Kunsthall; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome; and Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto.

Giorgio Griffa: Works 1965–2015

 

Edited by Mousse Publishing

2015

English

32,00€

 

Published by Mousse on Giorgio Griffa’s exhibition cycle at the Center d’Art Contemporain (Geneva), Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serravalles (Porto), Bergen Kunsthall and Fondazione Giuliani (Rome).

 


                                  

Gianni Piacentino

 

Published by JRP Ringier

July 2013

English/French

32,00€

 

This catalogue has been produced in collaboration with the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève. It is the first comprehensive monograph devoted to the artist and includes new essays written for the publication by Laura Cherubini, Marc-Olivier Wahler, Christophe Khim, Dan Cameron, an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and a timeline of illustrations realised by Marianna Vecellio.

 

 

  • Jay Heikes & Michael StickrodFrog Prints, 2008
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jay HeikesThe Family Tree, 2003
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jay Heikes, Todd Norsten, Conny PurtillUfficio, 2015
  • Gedi SibonyFountain Feet, 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jay HeikesDaily Rituals (Tuesday), 2015
  • Jay HeikesOur Frankenstein (bottom), 2015
  • Todd NorstenHow to Compromise, 2015
  • Todd NorstenHow to Compromise (detail), 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Justin SchleppL'altro è anche un fuggiasco, 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Justin SchleppUntitled (detail), 2008 – 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jay HeikesOrigins of Smut, 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jay HeikesOur Frankenstein (top), 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jessica Jackson HutchinsPainted with Starts, 2015
  • Jessica Jackson HutchinsPainted with Starts (detail), 2015
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • The Unknown ArtistEncore, 2014
  • Consequencesinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Conny PurtillThe Ground: Carl the Eagle, 2009

CONSEQUENCES

10 October > 12 December 2015

 

An exhibition organized by Jay Heikes with contributions from Felix Culpa, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Ari Marcopoulos, Josiah McElheny, Todd Norsten, Conny Purtill, Justin Schlepp, Gedi Sibony, Michael Stickrod, The Unknown Artist, and the ghost of Lee Lozano.

“Consequences is an attempt to keep a collaborative artistic pulse going. As awful as that sounds and after finally scrapping the term ‘collaboration’ because of it’s overuse and shortcomings, I’m hopeful that the exhibition will display the only space we have left; one that exists amongst a small group of friends that are enamored with each other and slightly suspicious of the outside world. I was reminded of the Lars Von Trier film, The Five Obstructions while working on the early versions of the show, searching for a novel way to change the process of making something we are all too familiar with. As we grow and fall in to the repetitive rituals that create any language, there’s a danger in it becoming predictable and manneristic, even to oneself. The Surrealists knew this and tried, through their parlour game of the same name (Consequences in French) to challenge this inevitable boredom. Through chance and a simple fold, multiple authors explored what I see more and more as the foundation of our everyday thoughts; a mixture of personal narratives, layered references and fused emotions.

In 2009, Conny Purtill explained to me his desire for a method of working that he described as inefficient. To my surprise, because of how efficient he is as a human being, his desire was to transform the process of making an artwork into a challenge by first creating a ‘ground’ for another artist to receive and work on top of. With a strange combination of influence, channeling both Carl Andre and Donald Rumsfeld, Purtill’s Grounds made their way to a number of artists who then accepted the understood contract. The results to date have been bizarre and trapped in a moment that can only be described as ‘pressurized’. To begin the transaction, a perfectly wrapped canvas arrives in the mail, once unwrapped the surface revealed rivals that of an all over material as satisfying as marble, created by painting and sanding multiple layers of gesso, India ink and graphite. The next question I’m sure every person who has ever received a Ground would have is, “Should I touch it?” Most do, and the resulting aggressions and marks have been shown together only twice previously, this exhibition being the third. In some ways, Consequences is the tree that is still growing from Conny’s seed and for that reason I asked him to put together a show within a show dedicated strictly to his Grounds. He immediately invited me, on me inviting him, and then acting as chief curator he invited himself, along with Todd Norsten, Felix Culpa, Josiah McElheny, and Ari Marcopoulos, to be involved.

The other organizing principle for the show came about after reading Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer’s book for Afterall on Lee Lozano’s ‘Dropout Piece’ and hearing Sarah talk about her research on Lozano’s hard to formalize works. I was struck by the fact that ‘Dropout Piece’ might not have been an artwork by Lee Lozano at all but a dare or proposition to a generation of artists that could regain control of their actions, or at least die trying. The looseness of the parameters were what drew me to the idea in the first place as I had been re-fashioning a set of elements and tools to change my work, and this was again a way to change the process and like Lozano, the tools and the process became everything worth obsessing over. I am a studio artist in every sense of the daily grind and in that daily grind movements become repetitive to the point of lunacy so including The Ghost of Lee Lozano is a tribute to an artist who’s memory affects the form of everything this show is about; an irreverent misunderstanding that at times could be based more in jest than anything else.

As every show has its own narrative, this one begins with someone being angry with me, which is maybe fitting for a show that calls itself Consequences. After organizing a series of shows from 2012-2014 under the name Trieste with a group of like-minded artists, I’m so thrilled that the evolution has been harder to control and the results more satisfying, provocative and problematic. In some cases, specifically with Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Justin Schlepp and Gedi Sibony, the lead up taught me that there is a point when a single artist can overtake collaborative intentions, owning the moment, resulting in a kind of sole authorship. This alone might be the most valuable thought to take away from an experience that involved a years’ worth of slapstick interactions, ranging from the purchase of an outhouse (a two-holer) and picnic table to the use of telepathy, frogs in Denmark, a box full of cardboard and wood, a stool with something to teach us and a realization that we are each other’s dysfunctional family tree. All of the artists have been game, agreeing to a series of conditions that are by no means ideal. Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Gedi Sibony, Todd Norsten, Michael Stickrod, the Unknown Artist, Conny Purtill, Justin Schlepp, Felix Culpa, Josiah McElheny, Ari Marcopoulos, and the ghost of Lee Lozano have unknowingly created a garden together, a very American one; drunken, dumb, colorful and of marginal taste.”

- Jay Heikes

  • Our Frankenstein (bottom half), 2015

CURRENT EXHIBITION

10 October – 12 December 2015

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present Consequences, an exhibition organized by Jay Heikes with contributions from Felix Culpa, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Ari Marcopoulos, Josiah McElheny, Todd Norsten, Conny Purtill, Justin Schlepp, Gedi Sibony, Michael Stickrod, The Unknown Artist and the ghost of Lee Lozano.

  • La Casa di Roma, 2015

LA CASA DI ROMA by PEDRO CABRITA REIS

L’albero della cuccagna: Nutrimenti dell’arte, a project conceived and curated by Achille Bonito Oliva

MAXXI, Rome

from 10 October 2015

11 October 2015 – 10 February 2016

 

Courtesy the artist and Magazzino, Rome.  With support from Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.

  • The Most Beautiful of All Mothers, 2015 (Photo credit: Jörg Baumann)

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL OF ALL MOTHERS by ADRIAN VILLAR ROJAS

14th Istanbul Biennial – Saltwater: A Theory of Thought Forms

5 September – 1 November 2015

 

Courtesy the artist, Marian Goodman Gallery, Kurimanzutto and with additional support from Fondazione Giuliani.

  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos) Act IIinstallation view at #kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy should our bodies end at the skin, 2012, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos) Act IIinstallation view at #kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Haris EpaminondaUntitled #03 tf, 2014, photo Bruno Lopes
  • André RomãoNotes on the history of violence (ghost version), 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Jacopo MilianiFax and Rope, 2014, photo Bruno Lopes
  • André RomãoSleep, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Haris EpaminondaUntitled #11 tf, 2014, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos) Act IIinstallation view at #kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Luca FrancesconiCreationism, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes
  • Luca FrancesconiCreationism, 2015, photo Bruno Lopes

Beauty Codes at Kunsthalle Lissabon

27 July > 26 September 2015

A project conceived and curated by CURA.BASEMENT Rome, Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, and #kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon

Act II
#kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon

with Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Haris Epaminonda, Luca Francesconi, Jacopo Miliani, André Romão, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

At the origin of modern thought there is a contrast between order and disorder, “contrasting impulses and tendencies, the modular combination of which produces in every epoch the work of art.” Taking Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy as a point of reference, the exhibition Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos), is a collaborative project between three international art spaces, CURA., Fondazione Giuliani and #kunsthallelissabon, which unfolds over a six-month period, in three consecutive legs. Loosely constructed around the narrative codes of Greek Tragedy, the exhibition begins with a single voice, then shifts – through the work of twelve international artists – to a gradual process of layering and accumulation, which disrupts the original order with multiple viewpoints, fractured boundaries and subverted roles, finally transitioning to a subsequent subtraction with a new set of objects and traces of previous actions. The complete exhibition cycle is a trajectory from a state of order and harmony, to disorder and chaos, leading to the formation of a new order and quietude.

The project’s Prologue took place in CURA. with the installation Why Should Our Bodies End At The Skin? (2012) by Lili Reynaud-Dewar, a work which serves as the link between the three parts of a play performed on three separate stages, and which was present in a different form in Act I, the group exhibition at Fondazione Giuliani, which also included works by Pedro Barateiro, Pablo Bronstein, Haris Epaminonda, Fischli/Weiss, Jacopo Miliani, Amalia Pica, Alexandre Singh and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.

Besides Lili Reynaud-Dewar, #kunsthallelissabon’s Act II of Beauty Codes will feature works by Haris Epaminonda, Luca Francesconi, Jacopo Miliani, André Romão and Daniel Steegmann Mangrané.

#kunsthallelissabon is generously supported by Secretaria de Estado da Cultura/Direção Geral das Artes (DGArtes), Teixeira de Freitas, Rodrigues e Associados and by EDP Foundation.

Presentation of the catalogue ‘Roma Publications 1998-2014′ in Amsterdam

Sabato 18 luglio 2015

Alle 17:00

San Serriffe

Sint Annenstraat 30, 1012 HE Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

Presentation of the catalogue ‘Roma Publications 1998-2014′ of the exhibition held at Fondazione Giuliani from October to December 2014.

Exhibition and catalogue were compiled and designed by Roger Willems, in collaboration with Lorenzo Benedetti and Marc Nagtzaam. With contributions by Gwenneth Boelens, Koenraad Dedobbeleer, Nickel van Duijvenboden, Marlene Dumas, Geert Goiris, Kees Goudzwaard, Sara van der Heide, Arnoud Holleman, Rob Johannesma, Jan Kempenaers, Irene Kopelman, Bart Lodewijks, Mark Manders, Marc Nagtzaam, Oksana Pasaiko, Wouter van Riessen, Nancy Spero, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Raymond Taudin Chabot and JCJ Vanderheyden.

 

with a short concert by Wouter van Riessen, a reading by Nickel van Duijvenboden and music by Experimental Jetset

ROMA PUBLICATIONS

 

Published by Roma Publications

2015

Inglese

15,00€

 

Catalogue of the exhibition at Fondazione Giuliani, from October till December 2014.

Exhibition and catalogue were compiled and designed by Roger Willems, in collaboration with Lorenzo Benedetti and Marc Nagtzaam. With contributions by Gwenneth Boelens, Koenraad Dedobbeleer, Nickel van Duijvenboden, Marlene Dumas, Geert Goiris, Kees Goudzwaard, Sara van der Heide, Arnoud Holleman, Rob Johannesma, Jan Kempenaers, Irene Kopelman, Bart Lodewijks, Mark Manders, Marc Nagtzaam, Oksana Pasaiko, Wouter van Riessen, Nancy Spero, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Raymond Taudin Chabot and JCJ Vanderheyden.

 

____________________________________________

 

PRESENTATION OF THE CATALOGUE ‘ROMA PUBLICATIONS 1998-2014′ IN AMSTERDAM

 

Saturday 18th July 2015

At 5:00 pm

San Serriffe

Sint Annenstraat 30, 1012 HE Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

Presentation of the catalogue ‘Roma Publications 1998-2014′ of the exhibition held at Fondazione Giuliani from October to December 2014.

Exhibition and catalogue were compiled and designed by Roger Willems, in collaboration with Lorenzo Benedetti and Marc Nagtzaam. With contributions by Gwenneth Boelens, Koenraad Dedobbeleer, Nickel van Duijvenboden, Marlene Dumas, Geert Goiris, Kees Goudzwaard, Sara van der Heide, Arnoud Holleman, Rob Johannesma, Jan Kempenaers, Irene Kopelman, Bart Lodewijks, Mark Manders, Marc Nagtzaam, Oksana Pasaiko, Wouter van Riessen, Nancy Spero, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Raymond Taudin Chabot and JCJ Vanderheyden.

 

with a short concert by Wouter van Riessen, a reading by Nickel van Duijvenboden and music by Experimental Jetset

  • Is it by Mistake or Design?, 2015 (detail)

SUMMER HOURS 2015

During the month of July 2015, the Giuliani Foundation is open from Tuesday through Friday, from 3.00pm to 7.30pm.

 

The exhibition Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos) will be on display until Friday July 17.

 

The Foundation’s next exhibition  will open October 9.

 

We will be closed to the public until the opening of the next exhibition.

  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Daniel Steegmann Mangranè/ (- \, 2013 (Inês & Josè Pereira de Jesus. Courtesy the artist and Múrias Centeno, Porto-Lisboa)
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giovanni Panebianco
  • Haris Epaminonda Untitled, 2014 (Courtesy Galleria Massimo Minini and the artist)
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Alexandre SinghDandy, 2013 (Raffaella e Stefano Sciarretta's Collection, Nomas Foundation, Rome)
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giovanni Panebianco
  • Haris Epaminonda Untitled #11 t/b, 2014 (Courtesy Galleria Massimo Minini and the artist)
  • Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Alexandre SinghBullen, 2013 (Courtesy Jacaranda Caracciolo Collection, Rome)
  • Amalia PicaA∩B∩C (line), 2013 (Courtesy Coll. Fundação de Serralves – Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, Portugal. Aquisition in 2013)
  • Amalia PicaA∩B∩C (line), 2013 (Courtesy Coll. Fundação de Serralves – Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, Portugal. Aquisition in 2013) photo Giovanni Panebianco
  • Pablo BronsteinYoung man spills cremated remains onto the floor I, 2012 (Courtesy the artist and Galleria Franco Noero, Turin)
  • Fischli and WeissThe Way Things Go, 1987 (© Peter Fischli David Weiss Zürich | Courtesy SprüthMagers Berlin and London; Matthew Marks Gallery New York and Los Angeles; Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zürich)
  • Haris EpaminondaUntitled #19 t/f, 2014 (Courtesy Galleria Massimo Minini and the artist)
  • Alexandre SinghStrumpet, 2013 (Courtesy Giuliani Collection, Rome)
  • Pedro BarateiroIs it by Mistake or Design?, 2015 (Courtesy of the artist)
  • Pedro BarateiroIs it by Mistake or Design?, 2015 (detail)
  • Lili Reynaud DewarWhy should our bodies end at the skin, 2012 (Courtesy Galerie Emanuel Layr, Vienna)

Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos)

22 May > 17 July 2015

 

A project conceived and curated by CURA. Rome, Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, and #kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon

ACT I
Fondazione Giuliani, Rome

with Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Pedro Barateiro, Pablo Bronstein, Haris Epaminonda, Fischli/Weiss, Jacopo Miliani, Amalia Pica, Alexandre Singh, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

from 22nd May to 17th July 2015

At the origin of modern thought there is a contrast between order and disorder, “contrasting impulses and tendencies, the modular combination of which produces in every epoch the work of art.” Taking Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy as a point of reference, the exhibition Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos), is a collaborative project between three international art spaces, CURA., Fondazione Giuliani and #kunsthallelissabon, which unfolds over a six-month period, in three consecutive legs.

Loosely constructed around the narrative codes of Greek Tragedy, Beauty Codes begins with a single voice, then shifts to a gradual process of layering and accumulation, which disrupts the original order with multiple viewpoints, fractured boundaries and subverted roles, finally transitioning to a subsequent subtraction with a new set of objects and traces of previous actions. The complete exhibition cycle is a trajectory from a state of order and harmony, to disorder and chaos, leading to the formation of a new order and quietude.

The project began at CURA.BASEMENT with the installation Why Should Our Bodies End At The Skin? (2012) by Lili Reynaud-Dewar, a work which serves as the link between the three acts of a play performed on three separate stages, and which will be present in a different form in the exhibition at Fondazione Giuliani. As in the classical tradition, the narrator is called upon to introduce the stage action before its actual beginning, to explain the events and consequent actions that cause a reversal of roles, the multiplication of forms and perspectives, disorder, and finally the (never truly orderly) rearrangement of the previous situation.

The work of Reynaud-Dewar, which consistently focuses on the relationship between body, language, literature and identity, is part of the mise en scène of the exhibition, the deus ex machina of ancient memory, the narrative voice that supports the complex unfolding of the entire performance.

Daniel Steegmann Mangrané’s / (- \ (2013) heralds the beginning of Act 1 at Fondazione Giuliani. Upon crossing the threshold into the Foundation’s exhibition spaces, the viewer passes through four aluminium curtains, as if crossing the proscenium of a stage. This relational demarcation of space and movement confounds the distinction between stage and audience, actor and viewer, and creates anticipation for what is to come.

Upon crossing the proscenium, the viewer finds himself centre stage, observer and participant in a juxtaposition of different artistic practices and display. Works by Haris Epaminonda punctuate the exhibition space like notes of a spatial composition, both centering the setting of the scene of action, while dismantling conventional modes of exhibition display. This space of action is observed by the bronze busts of Bullen, Dandy and Strumpet (all 2013), themselves characters from Alexandre Singh’s The Humans, a 3-act play about introducing chaos into an otherwise orderly cosmos, itself modeled after the comedies of Athenian poet Aristophanes.

Yet rather than creating a singular narrative logic, Act I builds a disorderly juxtaposition of artworks in which different narratives link or intersect freely to generate a superimposition of storylines. Any straightforward trajectory is further dismantled by a stratification of interventions, a tumbling together of performances that reorganize the role of the actors and viewers. Works by Amalia Pica, Pedro Barateiro and Jacopo Miliani particularly reconfigure the space with performative sculptures. With Plans for the Construction of Paradise (2010-2013), Barateiro disrupts the division between author and spectator by both interacting with the public and activating the traditionally passive role of the viewer. An allusion to games, rituals and riddles, the work’s myriad possible abstract patterns indirectly dialogues with Amalia Pica’s ABC (line) (2013), both installation and performance that is activated by the continual reconfiguration of multi-shaped Perspex elements, and metaphor of the different meanings, function and interpretation of personal and collective communication. In the works of Jacopo Miliani, whose research is primarily based on an investigation of teatrality, sculptures become moving physical bodies. Through minimal actions, refined gestures and simple materials, the spaces of the Foundation become the stage where chaos both takes shape and leaves residual traces.

In the video by Pablo Bronstein, Young man spills cremated remains onto the floor I (2012), exhibited to the public for the first time, a highly stylised mise-en-scène portrays a single male figure whose theatricality suspends him between the representation of a Classical Greek sculpture and of a Baroque courtier. Finally, Fischli/Weiss’s iconic film, Der Lauf der Dinge (1987), transforms everyday objects into agents of motion. A journey of action and consequence, precarious moments of balance and stability, transmutation and collapse, the connection between cause and effect leads the viewer to metaphysical questions about the world, about the way things go.

Prologue
CURA. Rome
from April 28 – May 31, 2015
with Lili Reynaud-Dewar

Act I
Fondazione Giuliani, Rome
from May 22 – July 17, 2015
with Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Pedro Barateiro, Pablo Bronstein, Haris Epaminonda, Fischli/Weiss, Jacopo Miliani, Amalia Pica, Alexandre Singh, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

Act II
#kunsthallelissabon, Lisbon
Opening Monday, July 27
from July 28 – October 23, 2015
with Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Haris Epaminonda, Luca Francesconi, Jacopo Miliani, André Romão, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané

 

With support by Bioera

Upcoming opening!

La Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos).

Opening Thursday 21 May
from 6.00 to 9.00 pm

from 22 May – 17 July 2015

  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr. Photos: Roberto Apa
  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr. Photos: Roberto Apa
  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr. Photos: Roberto Apa
  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr. Photos: Roberto Apa
  • Lili Reynaud-DewarWhy Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr. Photos: Roberto Apa

Beauty Codes at Cura.Basement Rome


BEAUTY CODES
(order/disorder/chaos)

A project conceived and curated by

CURA.BASEMENT Rome
Fondazione Giuliani Rome
#kunsthallelissabon Lisbon

At the origin of modern thought there is a contrast between order and disorder, “contrasting impulses and tendencies, the modular combination of which produces in every epoch the work of art.” Taking Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy as a point of reference, the exhibition Beauty Codes (order/disorder/chaos), is a collaborative project between three international art spaces, CURA., Fondazione Giuliani and #kunsthallelissabon, which unfolds over a six-month period, in three consecutive legs. Loosely constructed around the narrative codes of Greek Tragedy, the exhibition begins with a single voice, then shifts ­­– through the work of twelve international artists – to a gradual process of layering and accumulation, which disrupts the original order with multiple viewpoints, fractured boundaries and subverted roles, finally transitioning to a subsequent subtraction with a new set of objects and traces of previous actions. The complete exhibition cycle is a trajectory from a state of order and harmony, to disorder and chaos, leading to the formation of a new order and quietude.

PROLOGUE

CURA.BASEMENT Rome
Lili Reynaud-Dewar
OPENING APRIL 27

The installation Why Should Our Bodies End At The Skin? (2012) by French artist Lili Reynaud-Dewar serves as the link between the three acts of a play performed on three separate stages. In a state of orderliness, harmony and quietness, the narrator-author anticipates the climax of the events to follow. As in the classical tradition, the narrator is called upon to introduce the stage action before its actual beginning, to explain the events and consequent actions that, through an unsystematic process, cause a reversal of roles, the multiplication of forms and perspectives, disorder, and finally the (never truly orderly) rearrangement of the previous situation.

The work of Reynaud-Dewar, which consistently  focuses on the relationship between body, language, literature and identity, is part of the mise en scène of the exhibition, the deus ex machina of ancient memory, the narrative voice that supports the complex unfolding of the entire performance. A solo voice addresses the public directly, introducing the succession of future proceedings:

Why Should Our Bodies End At The Skin?

Set in the Roman amphitheater in Arles, the video-performance develops a different reflection on the human body. Although referring to the Classical tradition, aimed at a harmonic and formal proportion of the sculptural corpus, through the unfolding of the action the artist speaks here of reiterated objects, breaching that very tradition and, by undermining the established order, announcing the ensuing events:

I think these convoluted figures, with their rather foolish poses, are a sort of fantasy, for which these very formal figures might suddenly start moving on their own, released from their role in society, and become transgressive (L.R.D.)

Figures, therefore, of a potential performance: about to move, dance, rebel against the static boundaries imposed upon them. Moreover, the fact that the scene takes place in an area of the theater normally occupied by the public, is a further promise of a subversion of rules and roles.

The reiterated objects, the body parts, emerge from the story and step into the exhibition space. They become sculpture, the protagonists of new scenarios; new actors, the stars of other stages. The materialized reproduction of the newly finished sculpted object, also witnessed in its making, brings to the stage a topos of art history: the representation in the same scene of consecutive moments of a single story. But also put in relation with the fiction of a frozen time, the before and after of the same action.

 

ACT I

Fondazione Giuliani, Rome
opening 21 May
through July 17

Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Pedro Barateiro, Pablo Bronstein, Haris Epaminonda, Fischli/Weiss,
Jacopo Miliani, Amalia Pica, Alexandre Singh, Daniel Steegman Mangrané

ACT II

#kunsthallelissabon Lisbon
opening 27 July
through 26 September

Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Haris Epaminonda, Luca Francesconi, Jacopo Miliani,
André Romão, Daniel Steegman Mangrané

Lying Weapon on the Beach


Published by NERO

2015

English

28,00 €

 

Lying Weapon on the Beach is the catalogue published in conjunction with the exhibition by French artist Benoît Maire spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach) at Fondazione Giuliani (4 October – 14 December 2013), curated by Adrienne Drake. Using a wide range of media, including sculpture, photography, text, film and performance, Maire aims to construct an aesthetic system in which words and concepts emerge through visual and sculptural devices. His work, based upon philosophical, artistic and literary references, questions the affective value of a theory.

 

The edition, whose title is given by the names of the three sections of the catalogue (Lying, Weapon and Beach), is composed of a book and a DVD. The book consist of a collection of photographs taken by Benoît Maire during his exhibitions spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach) at Fondazione Giuliani in Rome and Weapon at David Roberts Art Foundation in London (2013), uniting both exhibitions into a common investigation by the artist. Both the sequence of photographs and the video are a visual story telling, the artist’s personal point on his work.

 

spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach) is an investigation into the act of seeing and the process of measuring which embodies the relationship that human beings maintain to their surrounding environment. In Weapon Benoît Maire observes how measuring devices disrupt and pervert our relation to the world. Either through performative actions captured on video, or through assemblage, the object gains a new meaning and function: it becomes a weapon and takes on violent associations.

 

ISBN: 978-88-97503-48-4
Format: 24.5 x 15.5 cm
Pages: 60
Language: Eng
Edition of 750 copies
Year: 2015

 

This catalogue is published in conjunction with the exhibition by Benoît Maire
spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)
4 October – 14 December 2013
Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea, Rome
curated by Adrienne Drake

 

Photography by Benoît Maire
3D model of “Lies on the beach” by Marie Corbin
Weapon captions by Vincent Honoré and Nicoletta Lambertucci, DRAF

 

  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Moon Phase, October 2014, Northern Hemisphere), 2014 (detail)
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Moon Phase, October 2014, Northern Hemisphere), 2014 (detail)
  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Christopher), 2014
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Now), 2014
  • Sam Fallsinstallation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2015, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Life and death, asiatic lilies), 2014 (diptych, detail)
  • Sam FallsUntitled (Life and death, asiatic lilies), 2014 (diptych, detail)

Sam Falls

14 February > 18 April 2015

 

“As the moon orbits the earth it tries to pull everything toward it, the only thing the earth can’t hold on to is water. People can hold on to everything but time. The ocean moves up and down, it cleanses the rocks and sand. Time heals our wounds but it ages our bodies. There’s a beauty and a sadness in the moon, in time. There’s eternal return in the cycle of the tide, it defies time while time defines us. This show merges natural elements and artistic processes to highlight our relationship to time, the intrinsic lightness and darkness of aging, the gravitational pull of life, and the shifting spectrum of melancholy.

The angle of light that illuminates the moon, or location of the moon to the earth, which obscures it, changes month to month depending on the axis of the earth. The moon artworks in the show illustrate an abridged cycle of the moon in October 2014. The phases of the moon were lit up with handmade beeswax candles, each candle a different color, photographed, printed on linen, and then leaned on the wall below the candles, which were re-lit and allowed to burn for their duration, dripping wax onto the print below. The candles were sticking out horizontally from the wall in the shape of the moon, so as they burnt down along their horizontal axis emitting the image of the moon, the wax dropped and landed higher up the vertical axis on the print below, the closer the flame came to the wall, the higher up on the print the wax landed. This vertical movement or wax going up the print describes time, like the tide moving up the beach, while the horizontal placement describes the geography of the moon and the waxing and waning light. The black prints illustrate the various cycles of the moon and the time it takes a candle to burn, while their respective counterparts in white, which were the bottom border of each print, illustrate the phases of the moon, an abstract timeline of a month.

Now is always the golden moment of time, unlike the past and future, which decay or unnerve. In my work I’ve always been concerned with how to translate time honestly and understand it more through art. One way of doing this was employing natural elements like the sun and rain to take the helm of the production. With less mediation on my behalf the viewer interacts immediately with time, such as with a piece of fabric left outside for a year with a tire on it to create an image of the tire by fading the fabric around it. The final image floats between an abstract circle and indexical image of a tire, and the productive process creates a rewarding artwork for myself and the viewer in the present, but it speaks to the past. The optimism of production also holds the melancholy of age.

The tide however moves in a relentless cycle, unlike the forward persistence of time. The same way I’ve always been interested in the duality in art between abstraction and indexicality, nihilism and optimism, I’ve also been interested in life, the personal and the universal. This idea is defined well by the linguistic “shifter”, a word like ‘this’ or ‘that’ which is filled with a different meaning dependent upon its referent every time, or proper pronouns like ‘I’ or ‘you’ which are filled with the person who holds them at the time. The heart of this issue is best said in Rosalind Krauss’ Notes on the Index Part 1 with a quote from Roman Jakobson “A shifter is ‘filled’ with signification’ only because it is ‘empty’”. ‘Now’ is a temporal shifter as I see it, it never refers to the same moment since time is fleeting, and the empty, non-existent future is “filled” when it becomes now. This simple idea holds great weight for me and the video illustrates this. Like polaroids of a flower, now blossoms and then dries up.

The helium pieces came about in trying to expand upon the idea of the shifter, not only how it functions temporally, but in the physical world beyond language. The glowing light is charged helium, and the floating balloons are helium filled. Helium here is acting in two very dramatic physical states but remains the same natural element. Most excitingly, the electricity lets us see the color of helium and the balloon gives it form, it is truly representational and quite abstract – I don’t know which one tips the scale and this back and forth gives the work its gravity. The forms of the glass are line tracings of the sides of my family and friends, myself, my dogs. The works show the microcosm of aging; buoyed up in the beginning, full of energy and life, dropping down to a perfect state with time, then eventually resting on the ground, deflated. What has been continues to burn and the balloons serve as a memory of what was.”

- Sam Falls, January 2015

Born in San Diego, USA, Falls currently resides in Los Angeles. He will open a solo exhibition at Franco Noero Gallery in Turin in March 2015. Recent institutional solo exhibitions include Ballroom Marfa, Texas (upcoming, 2015); Pomona College Museum of Art, California; Public Art Fund, New York (2014); LA><ART, Los Angeles (2013).

  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tonguesinstallation view
  • Becky BeasleyA Storage Space (After Faulkner), 2008 (Courtesy Laura Bartlett Gallery, London)
  • Michael Deanhnnnhhnnn-hnnnhnnnnh (Analogue Series), 2014 (Courtesy de kunstenaar, Herald St., Londen, Supportico Lopez, Berlijn)
  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tonguesinstallation view
  • Reto PulferHermetisch (Pencils vs Papers), 2006
  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tonguesinstallation view
  • Lucy SkaerUntitled (Le Siege), 2009
  • Jean-Luc MoulèneEchantillon / Monochrome, New York, March, 2010 (Courtesy de kunstenaar & Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris)
  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tonguesinstallation view
  • Matt MullicanChart, 2003
  • Carlo Gabriele TribbioliReperti per il prossimo milione di anni (Archivio), 2007/2009/2012 (Courtesy Laura Bartlett Gallery, London)

The Registry of Promise – Part Four

 

The Registry of Promise:
The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues

Becky Beasley, Michael Dean, Jean-Luc Moulène, Matt Mullican, Reto Pulfer, Lucy Skaer and Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli

Curated by Chris Sharp

 January 25 – March 29, 2015

 The Registry of Promise is a series of exhibitions that reflect on our increasingly fraught relationship with what the future may or may not hold in store for us. These exhibitions engage and play upon the various readings of promise as something that simultaneously anticipates a future, its fulfillment or lack thereof, as well as a kind of inevitability, either positive or negative. Such polyvalence assumes a particular poignancy in the current historical moment. Given that the technological and scientific notions of progress inaugurated by the enlightenment no longer have the same purchase they once did, we have long since abandoned the linear vision of the future the enlightenment once betokened. Meanwhile, what is coming to substitute our former conception would hardly seem to be a substitute at all: the looming specter of global ecological catastrophe. From the anthropocentric promise of modernity, it would seem, we have turned to a negative faith in the post-human. And yet the future is not necessarily a closed book. Far from fatalistic, The Registry of Promise takes into consideration these varying modes of the future while trying to conceive of others. In doing so, it seeks to valorize the potential polyvalence and mutability at the heart of the word promise.

Taking place over the course of approximately one year, The Registry of Promise consists of four autonomous, inter-related exhibitions, which can be read as individual chapters in a book. It was inaugurated by The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology at the Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, then followed by The Promise of Multiple Temporalities at Parc Saint Léger, centre d’art contemporain, Pougues-Les-Eaux, then The Promise of Moving Things at Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac, Ivry-sur-Seine, and will conclude with The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues at De Kabinetten van De Vleeshal, Middelburg.

The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues

 The fourth and final part of The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues, addresses language, modes of writing and the book. Stretched to its breaking point while being at once materialized and dissolved into a certain opacity, language assumes a plastic quality in this exhibition– as if it were something that could be grabbed onto and held, and yet remained entirely beyond one’s grasp. What is more, in this exhibition language has been made to shed its practical capacity of communication, entering into a much more marginal space of purpose, while nevertheless seeking to foster a productive, if at times, sinister reverie.

All the artists included in this exhibition have a close relationship to language, but one which varies both formally and referentially. Becky Beasley and Michael Dean possess a distinctly literary approach, as in Beasley’s paper back-sized sculpture A Storage Space (After Faulkner), 2008. Fashioned out of Black American Walnut and black glass, this sculpture, whose dimensions is the same as two, identical Penguin editions of William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, borrows the aesthetic vocabulary of minimalism, underlining its historical antagonism to narrative and effectively funereal character through the definitive closure of the book– a closure that nevertheless does not shut down narrative possibility, but rather opens it up through its very absence. This more pointed literary work is complemented by the suspended rotating sculpture, Bearings, 2014. This three meter long, brass cast is made from nine twigs collected by the artist’s father from wind-fall after the St. Jude storm. Assembled as such, they could be read as a syntactical construction evocative of a divining rod. Michael Dean’s hnnnhhnnn-hnnnhnnnnh (Analogue Series), 2014, consists of a dictionary drenched in red ink and left out in the sun to dry. Twisted and gnarled, it resembles a large, red tongue, itself beleaguered and ultimately disfigured by language. Other artists, such as Jean-Luc Moulène and Lucy Skaer sublimate language into form, transposing it into something that at once transcends and remains immured in a decidedly unintelligible signification. Moulène’s Echantillon/Monochome, New York, March 2010, for instance, comprises four panels, which have been uniformed colored with Bic felt markers. Readable as so many palimpsests laboriously transformed into monochromes, these panels speak to a glut and total saturation of word stuffs. Lucy Skaer’s sculptural installation Untitled (Le Siège), 2009, consists of a table whose surface has been carved into an 0 and which she uses to draw prints from. Language’s communicative function is subordinated to a seemingly counterintuitive image-making process. The work of Matt Mullican, Reto Pulfer and Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli address language as something that exists between divination, world-making and speaking in tongues. While Matt Mullican is known for entering trance states to draw and write, elaborating systems as he proceeds,  as exemplified in the complex drawing Chart, 2003, presented here, the work of Reto Pulfer creates sculptures and installations based on his own private language systems. The work Hermetisch, 2006, which involves cards, language and sticks, is activated by a performance in which chance and language determine the overall structure of the final result, which is evocative of a kind of soothsaying ritual. Finally Carlo Gabriele Tribbioli’s installation Reperti per il prossimo milione di anni (2007-09) is the byproduct of an attempt to create a myth and ritual in the 21st century, whose primary audience is located in the future. Composed of everything from performance, photography, drawing, video, sculpture and installation, the final product consists of a meticulously and methodically constructed archive, which, for all its will to fashion a future myth, is ultimately inscrutable.

New show in February

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present the solo exhibition, Sam Falls.

 

Opening Friday 13 February
from 6.00 to 9.00 pm

 

from 14 February to 18 April 2015

Next at the Foundation

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present Roma Publications 1998 – 2014, guest curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and Roger Willems.

 

Opening Friday 10 October
from 6.00 to 9.00 pm

 

from 11 October – 13 December 2014

 

On Saturday 11th October from 11:00am to 1:00pm, the Foundation will host a lecture by Louis Lüthi, a musical performance by Wouter van Riessen, a reading by Nickel van Duijvenboden and an informal conversation with the curators and some of the artists in the exhibition.

  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Koenraad DedobbeleerSimply a Logical Consequence, 2011
  • Bart LodewijksRoma Drawing, 2014
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Oksana PasaikoShort Sad Text (based on the borders of 14 countries), 2004-2005
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Marc NagtzaamOpening Image, 2014
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Mark MandersComposition with fake dictionary, 2014
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Sara van der Heide The Light in the Paper, 2014
  • Batia SuterSketch for Parallel Encyclopedia #2, 2014
  • Roma Publications 1998 – 2014installation view at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, 2014, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Geert GoirisDarkcloud, 2012

Roma Publications 1998 – 2014

11 october > 13 december 2014

 

With contributions by Gwenneth Boelens, Koenraad Dedobbeleer, Marlene Dumas, Geert Goiris, Kees Goudzwaard, Sara van der Heide, Arnoud Holleman, Rob Johannesma, Jan Kempenaers, Irene Kopelman, Bart Lodewijks, Mark Manders, Marc Nagtzaam, Oksana Pasaiko, Petra Stavast, Batia Suter, Raymond Taudin Chabot, Wouter van Riessen, and many others.

Roma Publications 1998 – 2014 is an exhibition that includes over 230 books and editions published by Roger Willems and Mark Manders in collaboration with a large number of artists, writers and designers. A publication is typically the end point of a project or exhibition; this exhibition, however, takes the printed format as its point of departure. Books, newspapers, posters and other printed matter are combined with artworks and installations relating to the publisher’s identity inside an exhibition dimension. The informal way of bringing art and publications together in a carefully composed exhibition gives clear insight into the working process of Roma Publications, which is based on a collaborative relationship to the artists. Another interesting element of this hybrid approach is that it questions the sometimes thin line between an original and a reproduction, and thus between the exclusiveness of an artwork and the democratic nature of a publication.

The exhibition aims to present the form of the book as an extended media that can involve the exhibition space. Some of the invited artists will contribute to the fading of the distinction between paper and space, image and material, original and reproduction (the print run of Roma Publications’ issues varies between 2 and 150.000 copies). Many of these practitioners use the book and printed matter as a central medium in their work, underlining not only the important role of publications to diffuse artistic production, but also in the rethinking of the book medium as an artistic practice.

The independent art publisher Roma Publications, founded in 1998 by artist Mark Manders and graphic designer Roger Willems, works in collaboration with artists, designers, writers and institutions. For the exhibition at the Fondazione Giuliani – the first occasion in which Roma Publications will be presented in Rome – the entire in-progress list of over 230 titles will be on display, in addition to a specially created reading room in which visitors can peruse each of the publications. Several new commissions and site-specific artworks will also be included in the exhibition, together with pre-existing works, all by artists who have actively collaborated with and participated in the activities of Roma Publications. With the exception of just two artists, all of these artists will be exhibiting in Rome for the first time, some for the first time in Italy.

On Saturday 11th October from 11:00am to 1:00pm, the Foundation will host a lecture by Louis Lüthi, a musical performance by Wouter van Riessen, a reading by Nickel van Duijvenboden and an informal conversation with the curators and some of the artists in the exhibition.

Curated by Lorenzo Benedetti and Roger Willems.

With support from the Royal Netherlands Embassy in Rome, the Flemish Government and Bioera

  • Hans SchabusKonstruktion des Himmels, 1994 (Courtesy of the artist and ZERO…)
  • Mandla ReuterThe Agreement, Vienna, 2011 © Mandla Reuter / Adagp 2014 (Courtesy Galerie Mezzanin, Vienne)
  • Antoine NessiUnknown Organs, 2014
  • Nina CanellTreetops, Hillsides and Ditches, 2011 © Nina Canell / Adagp, 2014 (Courtesy Konrad Fischer Galerie, Berlin ; Collection privée, Belgique)
  • Nina CanellPresent Tense, 2014 © Nina Canell / Adagp 2014 (Courtesy Galerie Wien Lukatsch, Mother’s Tankstation et Daniel Marzona)
  • Michael E. SmithUntitled, 2014 (Courtesy of the artist, Clifton Benevento, New York & Michael Benevento, Los Angeles)
  • Michael E. SmithUntitled, 2014 (Courtesy of the artist, Clifton Benevento, New York & Michael Benevento, Los Angeles)
  • Alexander GutkeAuto-scope, 2012 (Courtesy Galerija Gregor Podnar, Berlin / Ljubljana)
  • Alexander GutkeAuto-scope (photogramme), 2012 (Courtesy Galerija Gregor Podnar, Berlin / Ljubljana)

The Registry of Promise – Part Three

The Registry of Promise :
The Promise of Moving Things

Nina Canell, Michael E. Smith, Alexander Gutke, Antoine Nessi, Mandla Reuter, and Hans Schabus.

Exhibition from 12 September to 21 December 2014
Opening Thursday 11 September 2014 from 5 PM to 9 PM

Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac
La Manufacture des Œillets
25-29 rue Raspail, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine, France

The third part of The Registry of PromiseThe Promise of Moving Things deals with the so-called life of objects in our current pre-post-apocalyptic paradigm. Influenced in equal measure by animism, the much-discussed philosophical movement Object Oriented Ontology, the surrealism of Alberto Giacometti’s early masterpiece The Palace at 4 am (1932) and even the theoretical reflections of the Nouveau Roman novelist, theorist and editor Alain Robbe-Grillet (an OOOer, so to speak, well avant la lettre), The Promise of Moving Things seeks to address just that– the very idea that there exists some promise within objects in a world in which humans no longer roam the earth. Neither a critical rejection nor an endorsement of these ideas, the exhibition embraces the ambiguity at the very heart of the word promise. It questions to what extent this negative faith in the cultural and animistic legacy of objects is a genuine rupture with the anthropocentric tradition of humanism and to what extent it is merely a perpetuation of it.

Thus does the exhibition consist of works that features objects or processes which seem to possess some form of human subjectivity. For instance, the Austrian, Vienna-based artists Hans Schabus’ sprawling sculptural installation, Konstruktion des Himmels (1994), could merely be a random collection of variously seized wax balls and an elaborate light fixture or the most human forms of celestial organization: a constellation (which it is: a recreation of Apparatus Sculptoris [Sculptor’s Studio], identified and named in the 18th century by Louis de Lacaille). Almost but not entirely by association, German, Berlin-based Mandla Reuter’s sculpture installation, The Agreement (Vienna) 2011, which has been paired with Schabus’ work and is comprised of an armoire hanging from the ceiling, assumes a quasi, supernatural and animistic quality. The transference of so-called human subjectivity is unmistakable in Swedish, Malmö-based Alexander Gutke’s work, Autoscope (2012). This 16mm film installation portrays the trajectory of a piece of film passing through the interior of a projector, exiting into a snowy, tree-dotted landscape, ascending upward into the sky before plunging back down to earth and looping back into the projector, and repeating the process, all as if in an allegory of reincarnation. The US, New Hampshire-based artist Michael E. Smith’s slight sculptural interventions, which often consist of recycled textiles, materials from the automotive industry, animal parts, and a variety of toxic plastics, are known to possess qualities hauntingly evocative of the human body, as if the spirit of one had entered the other. Drawing his formal vocabulary from machines and tools, French, Dijon-based artist Antoine Nessi creates sculpture, which can perhaps be best described as post-industrial, in which the inanimate seems to take on an organic quality, assuming a life of their own. Finally, the practice of the Swedish, Berlin-based artist Nina Canell is no stranger to the kinetic and to a certain, if specious sense of animism. Something of a case in point, Treetops, Hillsides & Ditches (2011) is a multi-part sculpture comprised of four shafts of wood over the top of which a clump of Iranian pistachio gum has been spread (like the top of a match) and which slowly crawls down the sides of the wood, enveloping it, like living a skin.

Thus is the reception of each work complicated and vexed through issues of subjectivity, projection, necessity, and desire. Now to what extent the works are complicit in that reception both varies and is debatable. Whatever the case may be, it is virtually impossible to say, but this does not necessarily mean that it is impossible to conceive of a world without humanism, as argued by Robbe-Grillet, at its center.

EVENTS

Round-table
The Registry of Promise: one exhibition, four places

Thursday 11 September 2014 at 3:30 PM

As a prelude to the opening at Crédac, this round-table will bring together some of the main participants to the project The Registry of Promise. In the presence of the curator Chris Sharp, Lorenzo Benedetti, director of De Appel, Amsterdam (for The Promise of Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues at SBKM/De Vleeshal), Claire Le Restif, director of Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac, Ivry-sur-Seine (The Promise of Moving Things) and Sandra Patron, director of Parc Saint-Léger, Pougues-les-Eaux (The Promise of Multiple Temporalities).

Nuit blanche
Saturday 4 October 2014 from 7 P.M. to A.M.

In the framework of the group show The Promise of Moving Things, an outdoor screening of Michael E. Smith’s video Jellyfish (2011), projected from the inside of Crédac.

Summer hours 2014

During the month of July 2014, the Giuliani Foundation is open from Tuesday through Friday, from 3.00pm to 7.30pm.

The exhibition The Registry of Promise : The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology will be on display until Friday July 18.

 

The Foundation will be closed from July 28 – August 31.

  • Anicka YiTenzingbaharakginaeditscottronnienikolalosangsandrafabiansamuelaninahannahelaine, 2013 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger
  • Francisco TropaLantern, 2012 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger (Courtesy galerie Jocelyn Wolff)
  • Andy WarholSleep, 1963 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger (Collection of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh / Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.)
  • Patrick BernatchezBW (Black Watch) (detail), 2010 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger (Courtesy the artist and Battat Contemporary)
  • Rosalind NashashibiThe Prisoner (detail), 2008 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger
  • Juliette BlightmanThis World is not my Home, 2010 © Aurélien Mole / Parc Saint Léger (Courtesy Jacopo Menzani)

The Registry of Promise – Part Two

 

PARC SAINT LÉGER

 

The Registry of Promise:
The Promise of multiple Temporalities

 

Patrick Bernatchez, Juliette Blightman, Rosalind Nashashibi, Francisco Tropa, Andy Warhol, Anicka Yi

 

June 14–September 14, 2014
Opening Friday, June 13, 6:30pm

 

Parc Saint Léger, Centre d’art contemporain
Avenue Conti
58320 Pougues-les-Eaux
France

 

“The Registry of Promise” is a series of exhibitions that reflect on our increasingly fraught relationship with what the future may or may not hold in store for us. These exhibitions engage and play upon the various readings of promise as something that simultaneously anticipates a future, its fulfillment or lack thereof, as well as a kind of inevitability, both positive or negative. Such polyvalence assumes a particular poignance in the current historical moment. Given that the technological and scientific notions of progress inaugurated by the enlightenment no longer have the same purchase they once did, we have long since abandoned the linear vision of the future the enlightenment once betokened. Meanwhile, what is coming to substitute our former conception would hardly seem to be a substitute at all: the looming specter of global ecological catastrophe. From the anthropocentric promise of modernity, it would seem, we have turned to a negative faith in the post-human. And yet the future is not necessarily a closed book. Far from fatalistic, “The Registry of Promise” takes into consideration these varying modes of the future while trying to conceive of others. In doing so, it seeks to valorize the potential polyvalence and mutability at the heart of the word promise.

Taking place over the course of approximately one year, “The Registry of Promise” consists of four autonomous, inter-related exhibitions, which can be read as individual chapters in a book. It was inaugurated by “The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology” at the Fondazione Giualiani, Rome, in May which is followed by “The Promise of Multiple Temporalities” at Centre Parc Saint Léger, Pougues-Les-Eaux, then “The Promise of Moving Things” at Le Credac, Ivry, and will conclude with “The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues” at De Vleeshal, Middelburg.

Part two, “The Promise of Multiple Temporalities”, responds to the collapse of faith in progress, and the singularly conception of linear time that underpinned it with another conception of time, which is multifarious, contradictory, and nevertheless co-existent. Here time spiders out into a variety of directions, alternatively expanding, coming to a grinding halt, circling back upon itself, or transforming into water. A single revolution of Canadian artist Patrick Bernatchez’s Black Watch (2011), specially commissioned to a Swiss watch maker, requires not the usual twenty four hours to go full circle, but a thousand years, and in doing so, dwarfs human cycles of time to virtually nothing. Where this work uses the watch to extend time virtually beyond human comprehension, Portuguese, Lisbon-based artist Francisco Tropa’s Lantern (2012) goes back, so to speak, to the beginning of time. Part of his ongoing investigation of antique time-telling devices, Lantern, is a recreation of a clepsydra– an ancient device for measuring time by the regulated flow of water through a small aperture– which is then projected on the wall, like a magic lantern. English, Berlin-based artist Juliette Blightman’s This World is not My Home (2010) telescopes time onto two periods of the afternoon, 3 pm, which could be considered the dead time of the day, as well as 5 pm, which is traditionally quitting time. The work is comprised of a chair on a rug with a fire grate placed in front of an open window. Everyday at 3 pm, a single log is placed on the grate and lit, and then every day at 5 o’clock the song, “This World is not My Home” by Jim Reeves plays. Rosalind Nashashibi’s The Prisoner (2008) could be said to compress the loop embedded in Blightman’s work. This 16mm two-projector film installation, which feeds the same film through both projectors at naturally non-synchronized screenings, depicts a woman climbing a set of stairs over and over again, as if trapped in the same infernal instant. Andy Warhol’s Sleep (1963), which consists of an image of John Giorno sleeping for five hours and twenty minutes is a classic literalization of cinematic time as time. American, New York based Anicka Yi’s work Tenzingbaharakginaeditscottronnienikolalosangsandrafabiansamuelaninahannahelaine (2013) embodies, among other things, the sense of memento mori that inevitably courses through the entire exhibition. For this sculptural installation, Yi deep fried flowers in tempura batter and then placed them in a Donald Judd-like series of card board boxes full of resin. What is more, given the organic nature of this work, it is necessarily dialectical, in so far as, it is unstable and it will evolve over time.

“The Registry of Promise” is a co-production of Fondazione Giuliani; Parc Saint Léger, Centre d’art contemporain; Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac; and SBKM/De Vleeshal.

The project is part of PIANO, Prepared Platform for Contemporary Art, France–Italy 2014–2015, initiated by d.c.a/French association for the development of centres d’art, in partnership with the Institut Français Italia, the French Embassy in Italy and the Institut Français, with the support of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the French Ministry of Culture and Communication and the Nuovi Mecenati Foundation.

Upcoming opening!

La Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology, guest curated by Chris Sharp.

Opening Thursday 8 May
from 6.00 to 8.00 pm

from 9 May – 18 July 2014

  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Melancholy and Ecologyinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Peter BuggenhoutGorgo #29, 2013 (Courtesy Galerie Laurent Godin, Paris)
  • Jochen LempertThe Skins of Alca impennis, 1993 – 2014 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Melancholy and Ecologyinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Jochen LempertUntitled, 2005 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • Peter BuggenhoutGorgo #33, 2013 (Courtesy Galerie Laurent Godin, Paris)
  • Jochen LempertUntitled (from: Symmetry and the Architecture of the Body), 1997 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • Jochen LempertUntitled (from: Symmetry and the Architecture of the Body), 1997 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • Jean-Marie PerdrixCheval, bronze à la chair perdue 3, 2013 (Courtesy Desiré Saint Phalle, Mexico City)
  • Jean-Marie PerdrixCheval, bronze à la chair perdue 3, 2013 (Courtesy Desiré Saint Phalle, Mexico City)
  • Jochen LempertMartha, 2005 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Melancholy and Ecologyinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Marlie MulPuddle (Twig), 2014 (Courtesy Fluxia, Milan)
  • Jochen LempertFire, 2008 (Courtesy ProjecteSD, Barcelona)
  • Marlie MulPuddle (Faint Blue), 2014 (Courtesy Fluxia, Milan)

The Registry of Promise: The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology

9 May > 18 July 2014

 

‘The Registry of Promise’ is a series of exhibitions that reflect on our increasingly fraught relationship with what the future may or may not hold in store for us. These exhibitions engage and play upon the various readings of promise as something that simultaneously anticipates a future, its fulfillment or lack thereof, as well as a kind of inevitability, both positive or negative. Such polyvalence assumes a particular poignance in the current historical moment. Given that the technological and scientific notions of progress inaugurated by the enlightenment no longer have the same purchase they once did, we have long since abandoned the linear vision of the future the enlightenment once betokened. Meanwhile, what is coming to substitute our former conception would hardly seem to be a substitute at all: the looming specter of global ecological catastrophe. From the anthropocentric promise of modernity, it would seem, we have turned to a negative faith in the post-human. And yet the future is not necessarily a closed book. Far from fatalistic, ‘The Registry of Promise’ takes into consideration these varying modes of the future while trying to conceive of others. In doing so, it seeks to valorize the potential polyvalence and mutability at the heart of the word promise.

Taking place over the course of approximately one year, ‘The Registry of Promise’ consists of four autonomous, inter-related exhibitions, which can be read as individual chapters in a book. It is inaugurated by ‘The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology’ at the Fondazione Giuliani, which will be followed by ‘The Promise of Multiple Temporalities’ at Parc Saint Léger Centre d’art contemporain, then ‘The Promise of Moving Things’ at Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac, and will conclude with ‘The Promise of Literature, Soothsaying and Speaking in Tongues’ at SBKM/De Vleeshal.
Part one, ‘The Promise of Melancholy and Ecology’, addresses our increasingly forlorn and conflicted relationship with nature. Like so many Freudian melancholics, we are, it seems, unable to properly mourn the loss of something we can only imperfectly and incompletely grasp – nature, or our conception of it – because we can no longer separate it from our own egos. Thus this exhibition explores our perception of nature as something remote, largely of the domain of the unrecoverable past, and which can only be represented through extinction, as in the photos of Jochen Lempert of the Alca Impennis, or the Great Auk, which went extinct in the middle of the 19th century. Over the course of the past twenty years, Lempert has photographed 35 of the 78 extent examples, which can be found in natural history museums all over the world. The harrowing bronze and carbon sculptures of truncated animals by the French artist Jean-Marie Perdrix, which are made with the lost wax technique, speak to a similarly bygone intimacy with nature, but one whose infernal indexicality cannot but directly evoke Pompeii. The Belgian artist Peter Buggenhout’s tenebrous detrital assemblages tend toward a revised conception of the so-called natural by investing industrial materials with a quasi-organic quality. Finally, Dutch artist Marie Mul’s dark resin puddles, occasionally inflected with cigarette butts and plastic bags, assume a disturbing cogency in this context, as if they were the only plausible fluids available to our increasingly desolate conception of nature. And yet for all its apparent gloom, the work in this exhibition nevertheless collectively gestures toward the possibility that our perception of what it seeks to preserve, as opposed to mourn, might be less flexible than nature itself.

‘The Registry of Promise’ is a co-production of Fondazione Giuliani, Parc Saint Léger Centre d’art contemporain, Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac, and SBKM/De Vleeshal.

www.fondazionegiuliani.org | www.parcsaintleger.fr | www.credac.fr | www.vleeshal.nl

The project is part of PIANO, Prepared Platform for Contemporary Art, France–Italy 2014-2015, initiated by d.c.a / French association for the development of centres d’art, in partnership with the Institut français in Italy, the French Embassy in Italy and the Institut français, with the support of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, the French Ministry of Culture and Communication and Fondazione Nuovi Mecenati.

www.pianoproject.org

Seb Patane, book launch in London

 

Friday, February 21st

from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

 

X Marks the Bökship

210 / Unit 3 Cambridge Heath Road

London E2 9NQ

UK

 

Fondazione Giuliani and NERO are pleased to announce the launch on Friday, February 21st of The Foreigners Stand Still, the new artist’s book by Seb Patane. The book presentation will take place in London at X Marks the Bökship.

 

This book could be contemplated as a kind of narrative in which each chapter corresponds to a specific artwork. Through a collage of images and texts, the artist creates a constellation of personal, historical and actual events, sometimes invented, which inspired each work.

 

The catalogue has been published in conjunction with Patane’s 2013 exhibition The Foreigners Stand Still, at Fondazione Giuliani in Rome, curated by the Foundation’s director Adrienne Drake. At the launch, the book will be sold at the special price of 10 GBP, and signed by the artist.

 

X Marks the Bökship is a bookshop and project space for independent publishers in London, UK which specialises in small press publications by artists and designers. It promotes contemporary publishing activity through book launches, events and production resources that bring together individual practitioners in order to create a local publishing community.

The Foreigners Stand Still

 

Published by NERO

Edition of 1000
Italian/English

2013

30,00 €

 

The book, published on occasion of Seb Patane’s solo show, The Foreigners Stand Still, should be considered a narrative book. A single chapter corresponds to each work, within which the artist creates – through a collage of images and texts – a constellation of personal events, historical and actual events, sometimes invented, which inspired every artwork.

 

Texts by Niccolò Ammaniti, W. Holt-White, Seb Patane, Susan Janet and Steven Bailey, Paul Giovanni, Patrick Leagas, CCCP Fedeli alla linea

 

____________________________________________

 

SEB PATANE, BOOK LAUNCH IN LONDON

 

Friday, February 21st

from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

 

X Marks the Bökship

210 / Unit 3 Cambridge Heath Road

London E2 9NQ

UK

 

Fondazione Giuliani and NERO are pleased to announce the launch on Friday, February 21st of The Foreigners Stand Still, the new artist’s book by Seb Patane. The book presentation will take place in London at X Marks the Bökship.

 

This book could be contemplated as a kind of narrative in which each chapter corresponds to a specific artwork. Through a collage of images and texts, the artist creates a constellation of personal, historical and actual events, sometimes invented, which inspired each work.

 

The catalogue has been published in conjunction with Patane’s 2013 exhibition The Foreigners Stand Still, at Fondazione Giuliani in Rome, curated by the Foundation’s director Adrienne Drake. At the launch, the book will be sold at the special price of 10 GBP, and signed by the artist.

 

X Marks the Bökship is a bookshop and project space for independent publishers in London, UK which specialises in small press publications by artists and designers. It promotes contemporary publishing activity through book launches, events and production resources that bring together individual practitioners in order to create a local publishing community.

  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni PiacentinoMA F.F., 1965
  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni Piacentino 1965 - 2000installation view, detail, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Gianni PiacentinoBLACK TRIANGLE VEHICLE WITH GRAY FENDER, 1969-1972
  • Gianni PiacentinoDARK AMARANTH FRAME VEHICLE WITH BLUE-GRAY TRIANGLE TANK, 1971-72

Gianni Piacentino 1965 – 2000

8 February > 5 April 2014

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present Gianni Piacentino 1965 – 2000, the first retrospective in Rome dedicated to the artist from Turin. Curated by Andrea Bellini, the exhibition follows the major survey show held in the summer of 2013 at the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève (CAC). It represents a unique opportunity to discover the work of this extraordinary artist, one of the protagonists – only then in his early twenties – of the Arte Povera movement and, above all, author of a fundamentally autonomous and entirely Italian version of American Minimalism.

A unique personality and difficult to pigeonhole into a single group, Piacentino decided to abandon the Arte Povera group in 1968 – at the age of twenty-three – in order to dedicate himself to the creation of a vast range of curious two- and three-wheeled vehicles. These vehicles are idealised means of transportation with no practical purpose, characterised by aerodynamic shapes and elegant colours and decoration. Even the metals he uses have a pictorial and decorative quality: one need only look at the way gold, silver, copper, chrome and nickel come together in little details. In their formal variations, the vehicles borrow from aesthetics that range from the first racing cars of the twentieth century to the most modern, from the fuselages of early airplanes to kick scooters, from the fuel tanks of the motorbikes of the 1920s and 1930s to those of today. In form and structure, they tend to maintain the minimal character of the sculptures he had been making in the previous four years. Like his first minimalist objects, they also seem to appear as trajectories of colour through space, enriching themselves with curves, lines and ornamental elements that bring to mind the elegance of Art Nouveau and Art Deco. Beginning in the 1970s, Piacentino’s mechanical cosmogony started to bear a trademark: appearing on all his vehicles was the obsessive and omnipresent repetition of the abbreviation GP, the artist’s initials.

In this exhibition, Fondazione Giuliani presents the entire history of the artist, from the early “minimalist” sculptures to his extraordinary “vehicles” of the 1970s and ‘80s, to a selection of more recent works. A catalogue, produced in collaboration with the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève, also accompanies the show. It is the first comprehensive monograph devoted to the artist and includes new essays written for the publication by Laura Cherubini, Marc-Olivier Wahler, Christophe Khim, Dan Cameron, an interview by Hans Ulrich Obrist and a timeline of illustrations realised by Marianna Vecellio.

The work of Gianni Piacentino has been presented in innumerable public institutions, including the Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève; MoMA PS1, New York; Museum am Ostwall, Dortmund; Gesellschaft für Aktuelle Kunst, Bremen, National Galerie; Berlin; Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; Palais des Beaux Arts, Brussels. In 1977 the artist participated in Documenta 6, Kassel, and in 1993 in the XLV Venice Biennale.

With support from Bioera.

Upcoming exhibition

The Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition Gianni Piacentino 1965 – 2000, guest-curated by Andrea Bellini.

 

Opening Friday 7 February
from 6.00 to 9.00 pm

 

from 8 February – 5 April 2014

Hippocrene Foundation

 

The Hippocrene Foundation, Paris invites the Giuliani Foundation, Rome

 

Despite Our Differences

 

curated by Adrienne Drake

 

with Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Becky Beasley, Wolfgang Berkowski, Stefan Bruggemann, Manfred Pernice, Gianni Piacentino, Giulia Piscitelli, Heather Rowe, Nora Schultz, Alexandre Singh

 

October 8 to December 14, 2013

 

Hippocrene Foundation
12, rue Mallet-Stevens
Paris

  • Despite Our Differencesinstallation view, photo André Morin
  • Despite Our Differencesinstallation view, photo André Morin
  • Giorgio Andreotta CalòClessidra (U), 2013
  • Becky BeasleyPlank III (Covering Ground), 2008
  • Becky BeasleyFigure (Part 2), 2008
  • Wolfgang Berkowski(This is how you disappear/Grid) Case Study IV, 2013
  • Wolfgang BerkowskiModels for Inflatable Cages, 2004/2013
  • Stefan BrüggemannSeven Reversed Mirrors, 2010
  • Manfred PerniceUntitled (AVA), 2008
  • Gianni PiacentinoDark Red-Purple Small Pole III, 1966
  • Giulia PiscitelliPlessimetro, 2009
  • Heather RoweUntitled, 2009
  • Nora SchultzModel for Underground Airport (After Vantongerloo), 2010
  • Alexandre SinghConcerning the Apparent Asymmetry of Time: Painting, 2010

Despite Our Differences

8 October > 14 December 2013

 

Despite Our Differences

curated by Adrienne Drake

with Giorgio Andreotta Calò, Becky Beasley, Wolfgang Berkowski, Stefan Bruggemann, Manfred Pernice, Gianni Piacentino, Giulia Piscitelli, Heather Rowe, Nora Schultz, Alexandre Singh

October 8 to December 14, 2013
Tuesday to Saturday from 2pm to 7pm

Hippocrene Foundation
12, rue Mallet-Stevens
Paris

Despite Our Differences features a selection of artworks from the Giuliani Collection, with a site-specific intervention commissioned specifically for the exhibition. Rather than marrying the artworks to a central theme, the show instead departs from a loose logic, faithful to the hybrid nature of the Collection. The exhibition is envisioned more as a constellation of related ideas in which micro-conversations between works illustrate intersecting narratives and inter-relational properties.

Some of the works are site-responsive, reacting to different aspects of the building’s structure: surface, scale and viewpoint. The commission by Wolfgang Berkowski, (This is how you disappear/Grid) Case Study IV (2013), insinuates itself directly into the existing architecture, examining its ability to shape the representation and experience of art. His Models for Inflatable Cages (2004/2013) modulates and limits the movements of the audience, proposing a discussion of their sheer existence: the work versus the audience. Manfred Pernice’s, Untitled (AVA) (2008), instead pulls the viewer away from the surface and positions them in the very centre of the exhibition space, free to move around the work. This monument of interlocking particle boards, architectural fragments and disparate collection of discarded objects of consumption – an empty cigarette pack, dishes, a McDonald’s hamburger wrapper, commemorates the forgotten moments of the everyday. The architectural arrangement of Untitled (AVA) further acts as a counterpoint to the natural form of Giorgio Andreotta Calò’s, Clessidra (U) (2013), a bronze sculpture cast from a deteriorated mooring pole found in the lagoon of Venice. Over the years, the tide and salt water transformed this pole into a rough and fantastical looking monument to time.

The anti-monumental sculptures of Nora Schultz are typically made from found industrial materials, abandoned throwaways of contemporaneity, taken out of their original context and re-assembled by the artist. This candid materiality imbues her sculptures with the immediacy of the present moment. The floor-piece Model for Underground Airport (After Vantongerloo) (2010) activates the path of the viewer as they walk through the space. Gianni Piacentino similarly addresses the conventions of space and surroundings with his Dark Red-Purple Small Pole III (1966). This beautifully crafted work not only demonstrates the artist’s early, but long-standing inquiry into chromatic research, artistry and the ambiguity of form in space, in contrast to the rough-hewn materials of Schultz it pushes the boundaries of sculpture and design.

Such boundaries are further addressed by other works in the exhibition in a dynamic interplay between different media and the examination of form. Concerning the Apparent Asymmetry of Time: Painting (2010), by Alexandre Singh, envisages a chronicle of modern art if the second law of thermodynamics has been reversed: if, instead of a movement towards disorder, there would be a tendency towards order. The resulting story appears as an intricate flowchart that weaves together fact and fiction. The artist questions historical narrative and representation and shows ways that language and ideas can mutate and change over time. He positions drawing not only as a physical gesture, but as a conduit for arrangements that suggest possible interpretations and processes of connection.

The work of Becky Beasley moves between sculpture and photography in an exploration of the relationship between image and object, the body and interiority. Her two works in the exhibition, the photograph Figure (Part 2) (2008) and the sculpture Plank III (Covering Ground) (2008), underscore the artist’s interrogation of the way in which image, object and language operate in relation to each other. Heather Rowe instead interrogates the areas around sculpture, architecture and installation. She plays on transitional spaces and employs strategies that allude to the space of architectural models, but her use of scale and materials invites a one on one relationship with the viewer. In Untitled (2009), dark glass and angled mirrors reflect and distort the body as the viewer moves through the exhibition space. One has only an obscured reflection, a fractured representation of the self, which alludes to the subliminal fear of the fragmentation of the ego. The body is also the subject of Giulia Piscitelli’s black and white video projection Plessimetro (2009), in which indistinct, ghost-like figures try to move in unison to a steady, repetitive rhythm. Piscitelli studies the individual and collective everyday in an attempt to decipher the subject through an exploration of identity and persona. With his Seven Reversed Mirrors (2010), Stefan Brüggemann instead refuses the viewer the acknowledgment of the body. The mirrors are denied their original function and are turned towards the wall so that nothing can be reflected in them – no images, no ideas. By reversing the mirror, the artist ultimately negates the relationship between art and the viewer, art and reality.

 

The Hippocrene Foundation is an independent, public interest, family foundation whose primary mission is to contribute to strengthening the cohesion between young Europeans. It works towards “Living Europe” by providing financial support to cultural, educational and humanitarian initiatives. Since October 2002, the foundation presents art exhibitions entitled Propos d’Europe. These exhibitionsaim to place the spotlight on a country’s artistic scene as well as Europe’s richness and cultural diversity by presenting the works of artists living in various countries on the continent, whose creation is nourished by his or her culture.

The Hippocrene Foundation also originated the Hippocrene Prize for Education about Europe, which launched its first edition in 2010 in partnership with the Academy of Paris and with the support of the Maison de l’Europe de Paris and the European Association of Education (AEDE). Since 2012, the prize is organised at the national level in partnership with the national Ministry of Education and the Europe-Education-Formation-France agency. In 2013, the foundation also organised the Paris-Berlin prize, in partnership with the Allianz Foundation, the Paris and Berlin educational authorities and with the support of the OFAJ, to mark the anniversary of the treaty Elysée Treaty.

 

  • Benoît Maire'Lies on the Beach', detail, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire'Lies on the Beach', detail, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Lies on the Beach', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Lies on the Beach', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Mairei.e. n°6, 2012
  • Benoît MairePhotographie de 3 armes du soir, 2013
  • Benoît MaireUntitled, 2013
  • Benoît MaireSocrates, 2013
  • Benoît MaireInstrument to measure, 2012
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'The Cave', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît MaireStalactites, 2012
  • Benoît MaireLe monde donné à midi, 2013
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'The Cave', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'The Cave', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire'The Cave', photo Benoît Maire
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)installation view 'Instruments with the Sun', photo Giorgio Benni
  • Benoît Maire'Lies on the Beach', detail, photo Giorgio Benni

spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach)

4 October > 14 December 2013

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach), French artist Benoît Maire’s first solo exhibition in Italy. Using a wide range of media, including sculpture, photography, text, film and performance, Maire aims to construct an aesthetic system in which words and concepts emerge through visual and sculptural devices. His work, based upon philosophical, artistic and literary references, questions the affective value of a theory. While adhering to a rigorous conceptual approach, the artist is also engaged in an investigation of the more formal qualities of an artwork.

Part of Maire’s ongoing inquiry, spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach) is an investigation into the act of seeing and the process of measuring. A new body of works will be presented for the first time, together with recent pieces that have been adapted to the spaces of the Foundation. Divided into three parts, the exhibition proposes the taste of a narrative: the first part, “Lies on the Beach”, contains sculptural elements that can be moved throughout the space during the course of the show; the second part, “Instruments with the Sun”, presents handcrafted tools and videos of their manipulation, while the third and final part is conceived as a cave-like environment. The works are presented in contrasting – and sometimes confounding – ways of lighting (the Sun versus the Cave), yet their linear hanging on the walls suggests the linear narrative of a text.

A recurring component of the show is a series of works that allegorizes measurement and which embodies the relationship that human beings maintain to their surrounding environment. Through the measurement of objects and representations, the basic idea of philosophy as a mere science emerges. What the artist represents, then, is not philosophy itself, but a relation that is one condition of its possibility.

Born in Pessac, France in 1978, Benoît Maire resides in Paris. Recent solo exhibitions include Hollybush Gardens, London (upcoming); Weapon, David Roberts Art Foundation, London; Ohne Warum, Croy Nielsen, Berlin; Le fruit est défendu, Cortex Athletico, Paris (2013); History of Geometry, Halle Für Kunst, Luneburg and Walden Affairs, Den Haag; The Object of Criticism, De Vleeshal, Middleburg; Bientôt le métal entre nous se changera en or, Kunsthalle, Mulhouse (2011); L’espace nu, Frac Aquitaine, Bordeaux (2010). Selected group exhibitions include Les archipels réinventés 2, Ricard Foundation Prize, Marseille; L’amour atomique, Palais des Arts et du Festival, Dinard; Des gestes de la pensée, La Verrière, Bruxelles (2013); To the Moon via the Beach, Maja Hoffmann, LUMA Foundation, Arles; Le mont Juji n’existe pas, Frac Ile-de-France, le plateau, Paris (2012); Collections contemporaines, Centre Pompidou, Paris; Tableaux, Le Magasin, Grenoble; Desert Solitaire, CAC Vilnius (2011); Dynasty, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2010).

spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach) is organized by Fondazione Giuliani, Rome, in collaboration with DRAF, London, and supported by the Académie de France à Rome – Villa Medici and Bioera.

Giuliani Foundation

We are pleased to present the current exhibition
in the Giuliani Foundation

spiaggia di menzogne (Lying Beach),
a solo show by French artist Benoît Maire.

from 4 October to 14 December 2013

Summer Hours 2013

During the month of July 2013, the Giuliani Foundation is open from Tuesday through Friday, from 3.00pm to 7.30pm.

The exhibition The Foreigners Stand Still, Seb Patane’s solo show, will be on display until Friday July 19.

  • Seb PataneImperial (Enter Chorus and Actors), 2011-13
  • Seb PataneLast Dance of the Nodding Folk, 2007-13
  • Seb PataneLast Dance of the Nodding Folk, 2007-13
  • Seb PataneLast Dance of the Nodding Folk, 2007-13
  • Seb PataneWillow's Song, Homage, 2013
  • Seb PataneWillow's Song, Homage, 2013
  • Seb Patane, The Foreigners Stand Stillinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Seb PataneMovement (featuring Rose Kallal), 2013
  • Seb Patane, The Foreigners Stand Stillinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Seb PataneBring Me the Head of the Preacher Man, 2013
  • Seb Patane, The Foreigners Stand Stillinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Seb PataneMonsieur Carnot (Ruby), 2013
  • Seb Patane, The Foreigners Stand Stillinstallation view, photo Giorgio Benni
  • Seb PataneA Series of Graceful Juggling Tricks (The Foreigners Stand Still), 2013, performance
  • Seb PataneLive in Pankow III, 2013

The Foreigners Stand Still

20 April > 19 July 2013

 

Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present The Foreigners Stand Still, the first solo show by Seb Patane in an Italian institution.

The exhibition is based on an idea of unconventional performance and aims to convey a sense of organized chaos, playing on a balance between visual rhythms and subtly incongruent sounds. Photographs, video and sound pieces are like components of a theatre set, composed in order to suggest an environment suspended between reality and fiction where sounds and images operate at the subconscious level. Patane creates alternative spaces of action and fruition, reflecting on abstraction rather than representation to deconstruct, reassemble and trigger new productions of meaning.

Formally austere, the installations only appear to contain a clearly defined message, while creating flexible and dynamic environments in which reminiscences of architectural structures are combined with symbols of violence and collective rebellion. Photographs and prints of marked historical and political connotations are selected through an instinctive, subjective approach. What attracts the artist is not so much the content of these testimonials of the past – collective gatherings, rituals and propaganda messages – but rather their aesthetic function, at one time a tool to convey a precise message, today cues for new visualizations. In the work Imperial (Enter Chorus and Actors), for example, the image of the arrival of George V’s coffin at King’s Cross Station in London is read by Patane as “accidental choreography”: a photograph that in its origins depicts a State ceremony, but in the present suggests to the artist a sort of dance. The artist gives his own point of view, but the potential of the image continues to be called into play to develop from spectator to spectator. The sound element acts as a rhythmic particle of the visual structure, which increases the internal contrast while simultaneously constructing a type of mantra.

For The Foreigners Stand Still Patane has created new versions of Live in Pankow, A Series of Graceful Juggling Tricks and Monsieur Carnot, all of which are specially arranged into new configurations to underscore a core belief of the artist: that truths are never fixed and always changing. New productions include the sound piece Che La Festa Cominci – inspired by the book of the same name by Niccolò Ammaniti and created in collaboration with Giancarlo Trimarchi – and the video Movement (featuring Rose Kallal), which includes the participation of the artist and musician Rose Kallal and contains key concepts of the exhibition. Characterized by sound interferences that oscillate between a sense of play and menace, the video presents fragments of different experiences associated with a sojourn of the artist in New York in 2011 that resurface both directly and indirectly. Related to a performance held at the ICA in London, one section of the video connects, through the unsettling feeling of threat instigated by the very stillness of a group of men ready for action, to the phenomenon of peaceful protests, like that of the Occupy Wall Street movement. Patane unites his focus on the dynamics of protest with a reflection on the concept of tradition, and on the difficulty of entering into a relationship with the understanding of the history and politics of a particular country. This work is tied a story that recalls in a surreal way an experience of the artist and which he has used as the title of the exhibition.

Seb Patane (b. 1970, Catania, Sicily) lives and works in London. Recent solo shows include Year of the Corn, International Art Objects, Los Angeles (2011); 400 Sonnets in Reverse, Together, Kunsthalle Mulhouse, France (2011); Entrano il Coro e gli Attori, Galleria Fonti, Naples (2011); Seb Patane, Maureen Paley, London (2009); So this song kills fascists, Art Now, Tate Britain, London (2007); Live in Pankow, REC, Berlin (2007). Selected group exhibitions include La storia che non ho vissuto (testimone indiretto), Castello di Rivoli, Italy (2012); Utopia Gesamtkunstwerk, 21er Haus, Vienna (2012); Performative Attitudes, Kunsthaus Glarus, Switzerland (2010); Voyages from Italy, Magasin – Centre National d’Art Contemporain, Grenoble (2010); The Object of the Attack, David Roberts Art Foundation, London (2009).

the foreigners stand still

The Fondazione Giuliani is pleased to present The Foreigners Stand Still, the first institutional solo exhibition in Italy by Seb Patane.

Opening Friday 19 April

from 20 April – 19 July 2013

Nummer veertien, home

The new film by Guido van der Werve,
Nummer veertien, home,
will be screened from Tuesday through Saturday at the following times:

3:30pm, 5:00pm, 6:30pm

Enjoy the film!

  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer veertien, home, 4k video, 54'00'', Poland, Greece, Holland, Germany, Egypt, India, France 2012 Courtesy Monitor Gallery, Rome; Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam; Marc Foxx, Los Angeles; Luhring Augustine, New York; Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.
  • Guido van der WerveNummer vertieen, home, 2013 installation view photo Giorgio Benni
  • Guido van der WerveNummer vertieen, home, 2013 installation view photo Giorgio Benni
  • Guido van der WerveNummer dertien, emotional poverty, Effugio C, You’re always only half a day away, 2010-11 installation view photo Giorgio Benni
  • Guido van der WerveEverything is going to be alright, 2007

Nummer Veertien, Home

5 February > 23 March 2013

 

Since 2003, when Guido van der Werve made his first film, the Dutch artist has based his works on offbeat, intense performative actions, which play on a continual shift from the real to the fantastic. Music, resistance and nature reoccur as symbolic components in his metaphysical visions, in which the artist often assumes the multiple roles of protagonist, composer and marathon runner. Solitary challenges of overcoming one’s own personal limits, marked by fears and emotional obstacles, are chronicled in a matter-of-fact way, capable however, of revealing a profoundly ironic and romantic spirit.

Nummer veertien, home (2012) is his most recent and first feature-length film. Presented for the first time in Italy, it will be on view at the Fondazione Giuliani from 5th February through 23rd March 2013. Concurrently with the screening of the film, it will also be possible to see the video You’re always only half a day away, which constitutes one of the components of the work Nummer dertien, emotional poverty from 2010-2011.

For twenty days and a distance of over 1700 km, Guido van der Werve embarked on an extreme pilgrimage from Poland to France, swimming, cycling and running from Warsaw to the tomb of Frédéric Chopin in Paris. The Polish composer’s dying wish, who was to be buried in the Parisian cemetery of Père Lachaise, was that his heart be returned to Poland to the Holy Cross Church in Warsaw, where the film Nummer veertien, home begins. A requiem composed by van der Werve accompanies three intersecting narratives: his own nostalgic journey at the pace of a triathlon, a surreal return to his native Holland, and a documentary on Alexander the Great who, like Chopin, died far from home. A key element of the film and characteristic of van der Werve’s practice, is the calibrated use of subtle deadpan humour that loosens the gloomy and melancholic atmosphere of his works and make his arduous performances almost surreal. The search for a balance between contradicting states of mind and emotions acts as metaphor of an intimate interior conflict that through the various films is extrapolated, played down, made more sustainable.

In Nummer dertien, emotional poverty, the myth of ‘no return’, emotional stasis and a latent sense of failure become triggers of three extreme endurance tests which are documented through a series of slides, photographs, text and the video You’re always only half a day away. In the video van der Werve runs without stopping around the perimeter of his house in Finland, ironically challenging both himself and the attention of the spectator for twelve consecutive hours.

Coproduced by the Fondazione Giuliani, Nummer veertien, home was presented for the first time in Europe at the International Film Festival Rotterdam, and is currently on view at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam from 25th January to 28th April 2013.

Guido van der Werve (b. 1977, Papendrecht, Holland) lives in Hassi, Finland and Berlin. Recent solo shows include Secession, Vienna (upcoming 2013); Nummer veertien, Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York (2012); Emotional Poverty, Galerie Juliette Jongma, Amsterdam (2011); Blackbox, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington DC (2009); Everything is going to be alright, Hayward Gallery, London (2008); on parity of days, Kunsthalle Basel (2008).

summer hours 2012

During the month of July 2012, the Giuliani Foundation is open from Tuesday through Friday, from 3.00pm to 7.30pm.

The exhibition Scott Burton, a project by Oscar Tuazon, will be on display until Friday July 20.

Oscar Tuazon

Two-part Chair, ink on paper, 2012

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Scott Burton by Oscar Tuazon

Installation view, photo Giorgio Benni.

Oscar Tuazon/Elias Hansen

Untitled (Kodiak Staircase), 2008

Oscar Tuazon

Formerly, when how to get my living honestly..., 2012

Peter Fend

Uber die Grenze: May Not Be Seen or Read or Done, 2012 (detail)

Beau Dick

Shaman, 2009

Oscar Tuazon

Two Possible Chairs IV, 2012

Oscar Tuazon/Elias Hansen

Untitled (Kodiak Lamp), 2008

Scott Burton

21 April > 20 July 2012

 

Scott Burton
by Oscar Tuazon

with Scott Burton, Beau Dick, Peter Fend, Jackie Ferrara, Martino Gamper, Bruce Goff, Elias Hansen, Bea Schlingelhoff, Oscar Tuazon

“The base, or pedestal, is a specialized form of table.”
– Scott Burton

I called the show “Scott Burton” because I had to put a name on how I feel. Probably it would have made more sense to take the title from Bea Schlingelhoff, and call it “Fuck The Participant”, a pun that would have described more accurately the dual nature of Burton’s work, subtly perverse, antagonistic, sexy. There’s a great self-portrait of Burton, posing in Afro wig and white face, wearing overalls and an enormous dildo, that could very well be subtitled Fuck the Participant.

I guess I tried to become Scott Burton. I don’t know how other people do it, but that’s how I do it. Which was strange. A demon came into my head. Suddenly I was alone inside that demon’s house. I tried to build pedestals, I tried to build tables. I thought very literally about becoming another person, I was wearing a Beau Dick mask. Dick makes masks in the Kwakiutl ceremonial tradition, objects designed to serve a function—but an idea of function expanded to include hallucinatory states and dreams. Call it psychic utility, I don’t know what to call it but I know what it does. I’m sure that Dick tries on the masks while he makes them, the way Martino Gamper tests the feel of a chair, by occupying it, testing it out with his body. Which is something you can’t say about painting. Bea said “painting as a medium might be inherently suspect,” and I tend to agree with her.

The renderings of Bruce Goff, the original outlaw architect, are closer to science fiction illustration than to traditional architecture. You can imagine Goff, in silk pajamas, building crystal fractal staircases in his mind, unearthing the orb, gilding the entire portal, inside and out. Elias and I tried that too, it was bad. Jackie Ferrara has taken a more systematic approach, rigorous and lean, a self-replicating program. Ferrara, one of the few artists to have ventured into the dangerous zone between sculpture and furniture prior to Burton, is known primarily for three-dimensional works. The extensive selection of drawings and photographs included in the exhibition, though they span the period from 1981-2007, display a remarkable consistency. Unpretentious and plain, the drawings have a rare didactic clarity—reading them is an almost physical experience.

Scott Burton was invited to do the seating for the MIT art gallery while the building was still being designed and he spent a lot of time going over the plans with the architect, I.M. Pei, finally fixating on a particular feature of the building. Burton’s proposal, of a stone bench in the lobby of the space, incorporated the hand railing of the building’s mezzanine as the backrest for the bench, quietly disappearing into the architecture of the building. Or, looked at another way, Burton’s proposal perverts the proscribed function of the space, opening a zone of confusion at the center of the building. I think that’s called topping from the bottom. Of course this radical gesture was actually illegal, contravening the building code for handrail height and use. The proposal was deemed too dangerous to build, and Burton moved on, developing the initial idea into an elegant and restrained bench, following the curve of the handrail from a distance, disappearing again.

Burton’s work is characterized by invisibility—perversely banal, inconspicuous, ugly, painful on the genitals, masochistic—and a kind of brutal self-recognition, painful realism. Brancusi came up with a name, ‘pragmatic sculpture’ that Burton liked to use, but Burton was a lot harder on himself than Brancusi ever was. Whereas Burton was a true nihilist, Peter Fend remains, for some unknown reason, an incurable optimist, the only person I can think of who still believes, fervently, in the revolutionary potential of an artwork to transform the world. What they share, apart from a masochistic love of failure, is a visionary and inspiring ideal of art as invisible, ubiquitous, elemental. Alive in the world. And, like Ferrara’s drawings, resolutely partial, incomplete—instructions awaiting action.

The thing about a chair is that when you’re using it you aren’t looking at it. Can a sculpture of a chair can also be a chair, can a thing can have a dual identity, be doubled, transsexualized, why can’t a thing can be two things?

Bruce Ferguson in conversation with Ahmet Öğüt

Friday 16 September 2011
2.00 pm

at SALT Beyoğlu
Istiklal Caddesi 136, Beyoğlu 34430 Istanbul

Within the context of Ahmet Öğüt’s current exibition at SALT Beyoğlu, Across the Slope, curator and critic Bruce Ferguson and Ahmet Öğüt will discuss the artist’s recent project Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.

The catalogue of the exibition at Fondazione Giuliani, which includes an essay by Ferguson, will be presented during the conversation.

Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours

 

Published by Nero
Edition of 1000
2011
Italian/English
20,00€

 

The catalogue, published in conjunction with the exhibition by Ahmet Öğüt, Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours, includes a special project by the artist and texts by Adrienne Drake and Bruce W. Ferguson.

 

 

 

____________________________________________

 

BRUCE FERGUSON IN CONVERSATION WITH AHMET ÖĞÜT

 

Friday 16 September 2011
2.00 pm

at SALT Beyoğlu
Istiklal Caddesi 136, Beyoğlu 34430 Istanbul

Within the context of Ahmet Öğüt’s current exibition at SALT Beyoğlu, Across the Slope, curator and critic Bruce Ferguson and Ahmet Öğüt will discuss the artist’s recent project Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours at Fondazione Giuliani, Rome.

The catalogue of the exibition at Fondazione Giuliani, which includes an essay by Ferguson, will be presented during the conversation.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello

Installation view, photo Francesco De Michelis.

Simon Dybbroe Møller

O and No, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

O and No, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

O and No, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

O, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

O, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

Produce, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

Produce, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

Things Thinking Things, 2011

Simon Dybbroe Møller

Things Thinking Things, 2011

Hello

11 October 2011 > 28 January 2012

 

Hello,

has a certain non-word-ness about it. It feels more like sound and less like communication of meaning than most words. When Thomas Edison discovered the principle of recorded sound, the first word he yelled into the machine was ‘halloo’. Hello is the title ofthe audio piece that, with a stressed correctness of tone and attempted neutrality, will speak to you when you enter the Fondazione Giuliani. Hello is also the title ofthis exhibition.

I often suffer from sudden dizziness when thinking that perhaps things gather in clusters by themselves.
- Pablo Henrik Llambias

It will be like this: when you stand or walk on O and No, a gym floor that has been assembled with a different intention than the ruliness of sports, you will see that the floor has been reduced to an image. An image of material excess. Or an image of nothing. An image of that which turns hell into hello. On the walls you will see O: in these inkjet prints, the same subject is reproduced over and over again, only in different colours and styles. They have their origin in Word, a program released in 1983 by Microsoft. In this program, one is offered a selected range of colours and sizes to produce and output letters and numbers. One is likewise offered the option to then cancel these choices. These O’s are unfinished. They have never gone full circle to become holes in language. They simply smile back at us. If O is a thing, it is a thing that signifies nothing.

Things Thinking Things consists of bundles of photographed objects chosen according to the simplest of all phonetic principles, that profane poetic tool: the rhyme. Here, the rhyme is a machine and it spits out objects. Each family of objects is arranged in stacks according to generation. And finally, Produce. Straight-from-the-package household-printers, hanging on the wall, sticking out their tongues. They have been unplugged in the midst of printing their very first piece of paper, and now they hang there, substituting the frame, which would otherwise have held the image. The new bike does not exist.

 

 

Hello ismy second exhibition in Italy this autumn. The first, entitled O, opened in Milan some weeks ago. O, a sort of premature echo of Hello, oscillates between the too much and the less than little. The same could be said of Hello, but this show goes a step further. Hellotakes on limitless expenditure and passive indifference as modes of resistance.

Yours truly,

Simon Dybbroe Møller

 

Berlin, September 2011

Rischi minori

 

Published by Nero
Edition of 1000
2011
Italian/English
20,00€

 

The catalogue, published in conjunction with the exhibition by Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori, includes a special project by the artist and texts by Stefano Chiodi and Salvatore Lacagnina. This is the first monograph dedicated to Giulia Piscitelli.

 

 

Ahmet Ögüt

River Crossing Puzzle, 2010 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

River Crossing Puzzle, 2010 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

1 of 1000 Ways to Stabilise a Wobbly Table, 2011 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

1 of 1000 Ways to Stabilise a Wobbly Table, 2011 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

My Spy Desk, 2011 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

My Spy Desk, 2011 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Ahmet Ögüt

Wikipolis, 2011

Ahmet Ögüt

Wikipolis, 2011 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Once upon a time, works by Öğüt

Peter Coffin | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 5 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Peter Coffin | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 5 (photo Ahmet Ögüt)

Giovanni Anselmo | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 3 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Giovanni Anselmo | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 3 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Joseph Kosuth | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 2 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Joseph Kosuth | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 2 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Mircea Cantor | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 7 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Mircea Cantor | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 7 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Carl Andre | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 1 (photo Ahmet Ögüt)

Marina Abramovic | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 4 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Sislej Xhafa | Ahmet Ögüt

Intervention n. 6 (photo Gilda Aloisi)

Sislej Xhafa

Beh-Rang, 2004

Cyprien Gaillard

Real Remnants of Fictive Wars, Part II, 2004

Giuliani Collection interventions

Peter Coffin
Untitled (Surrealist Frame), 2007
gilded frame; 76,2 x 71,2 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.5: various industrial frames

Giovanni Anselmo
Senza titolo, 1984-1991
canvas, granite, steel cord; 220 x 150 x 70 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.3: letter in glass bottle

Joseph Kosuth
W.: On Color #9 (Red), 1991
neon; 10 x 100 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.2: photograph

Mircea Cantor
Tasca che punge (Itching Pocket), 2007
Armani trousers, stinging nettles, earth; 170 x 185 x 15 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.7: various clothing items

Carl Andre
3rd Steel Triangle, 2008
hot rolled steel; 1 x 150 x 150 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.1: 2 tape measures

Marina Abramovic
Nude with Scorpio (Open Eyes), 2005
photograph; 127,5 x 147,5 cm
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.4: white vinyl text

Sislej Xhafa
Beh-Rang, 2004
DVD; 4 min. 41 sec. loop
Ahmet Öğüt, Intervento n.6: burned walls

Cyprien Gaillard
Real Remnants of Fictive Wars, Part II, 2004
33mm film transferred to DVD; 7 min. 14 sec.
n.d.r. See Wikipolis

The Taking Place of an Art Publication

The Taking Place of an Art Publication

Tuesday June 21st 2011
Villa Romana, via Senese 68, Florence
7:30 pm

avere luogo Book Launch and Discussion
followed by an evening of music selected by NERO

With the release of the catalogue avere luogo, published for Nora Schultz’s 2010 solo exhibition at the Fondazione Giuliani in Rome,

Nora Schultz, artist in residence at Villa Romana, Florence
Adrienne Drake, Curator of the Fondazione Giuliani, Rome
Francesco de Figueiredo and Lorenzo Gigotti, NERO, Rome

will host an open discussion addressing today’s production and reception of art publications, and the relevance of publishing within an art context. How does a publication manifest certain frameworks within the process of an exhibition, and how can it challenge these frames, if not break them? How can a catalogue step beyond its primary function of simply documenting and representing an exhibition? Can a catalogue’s design and layout become an active component and extension of the show? Through the collaboration between artist, curator and designer, is it possible to make the confines between these positions more permeable?

In addition, NERO will discuss the history of Nero Magazine, a free press founded in 2004, and their subsequent projects in the ambit of contemporary culture.

Organised by the Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea in collaboration with NERO and Villa Romana.

Info

The Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea encourages the development of partnerships and collaborations with institutions.

Group and student visits are warmly welcomed and can be arranged by appointment.

avere luogo (taking place)

 

Published by Nero
Edition of 1000
2011
Italian/English
25,00€

 

Published in conjunction with the exhibition by Nora Schultz, avere luogo, and includes texts by Barbara Buchmaier, Adrienne Drake, Nora Schultz and Josef Strau.

 

The catalogue includes includes a special project by Nora Schultz.

 

The final section of the catalogue also includes a special project carried out by the artist in collaboration with NERO. The final 32 pages are part of a selection of over 2,000 70 x 100 cm test sheets originating from the Marchesi printing houses, used for the print machines’ start-up. The layouts of the books to be produced are printed on these sheets, one on top of another. This gives rise to a series of palimpsests, characterized by a stratification of levels which, randomly overlapped, create abstract images of an almost sculptural physicality. Given that this special project is composed of recycled material, each one of these catalogues, in a limited edition of 1,000 copies, is unique and original.

 

 

 

____________________________________________

 

THE TAKING PLACE OF AN ART PUBLICATION

 

The Taking Place of an Art Publication

Tuesday June 21st 2011
Villa Romana, via Senese 68, Florence
7:30 pm

avere luogo Book Launch and Discussion
followed by an evening of music selected by NERO

With the release of the catalogue avere luogo, published for Nora Schultz’s 2010 solo exhibition at the Fondazione Giuliani in Rome,

Nora Schultz, artist in residence at Villa Romana, Florence
Adrienne Drake, Curator of the Fondazione Giuliani, Rome
Francesco de Figueiredo and Lorenzo Gigotti, NERO, Rome

will host an open discussion addressing today’s production and reception of art publications, and the relevance of publishing within an art context. How does a publication manifest certain frameworks within the process of an exhibition, and how can it challenge these frames, if not break them? How can a catalogue step beyond its primary function of simply documenting and representing an exhibition? Can a catalogue’s design and layout become an active component and extension of the show? Through the collaboration between artist, curator and designer, is it possible to make the confines between these positions more permeable?

In addition, NERO will discuss the history of Nero Magazine, a free press founded in 2004, and their subsequent projects in the ambit of contemporary culture.

Organised by the Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea in collaboration with NERO and Villa Romana.

Ahmet Öğüt

Wikipolis, 16mm film, 2011

Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours

30 April > 23 July

 

With a keenly perceptive and sharp wit, Ahmet Öğüt examines everyday happenstance, modes of behaviour and informal gestures which bear witness to broader global social and political structures. Through diverse means of expression, from installation and performance to drawing, video and interventions in public space, Öğüt weaves loose narratives that meander between artistic practice and social life to provoke critical consciousness and subtle shifts in perspective.

In Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours, Öğüt’s solo exhibition at the Fondazione Giuliani, the artist moves his practice in a new direction, using an art collection as source material. Öğüt has selected works by Marina Abramovic, Giovanni Anselmo, Carl Andre, Mircea Cantor, Peter Coffin, Cyprien Gaillard, Joseph Kosuth and Sislej Xhafa from the Giuliani Collection to create “atmospheres” or interventions around each work which call attention to the characteristics of the works themselves, while also appropriating them to create multi-layered narratives with an open trajectory to generate and expand upon new meanings. Underlining these interventions is the consideration that no artwork has one single reading but is open to subjective interpretation. While paying homage to the works by these artists, Öğüt questions authorial originality and intentionality. He creates visual texts, which invite the viewer to really ponder a work of art while formulating new considerations and multiple readings.

Interspersed throughout the exhibition spaces are a body of artworks by the artist himself, several of which have been produced specifically for the show. These works underscore Öğüt’s continuing interest in time, sociological structures and mechanisms of surveillance and control. The 16mm film collage, Wikipolis, juxtaposes a scene from Metropolis, Fritz Lang’s seminal 1927 film on urban dystopia, with an image of a former nuclear bunker in Stockholm that now houses a data centre with 8,000 computer servers, two of which belong to WikiLeaks. The interactive installation, River Crossing Puzzle, transforms a traditional children’s puzzle into a playful but politically charged game, while with My Spy Desk, the exhibition’s viewers become unintentional protagonists. Ultimately, Once upon a time a clock-watcher during overtime hours invites the viewer to bear witness to and participate in an exercise of irony, nuance and layered interpretation.

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Jamie Shovlin e Lustfaust

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), performance, 2010

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), photographs of the performance

Jamie Shovlin, Hiker-Meat (Rough Cut)

Hiker Meat (Rough Cut)

Wednesday 2 February 2011 at 8:00pm

 

A performance by Jamie Shovlin and Lustfaust

Teatro Eliseo
via Nazionale 183, Rome

The live performance, Hiker Meat (Rough Cut), is coordinated by Ilaria Gianni.

Organised by the Fondazione Giuliani

In collaboration with Roma Capitale, Assessorato alle Politiche Culturali e della Comunicazione – Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali

British artist Jamie Shovlin is interested in the tension between truth and fiction, reality and fabrication, history and memory. In his new project, Hiker Meat, Shovlin plays homage to the exploitation films of the 1970s and reconstructs the history of a non-existent horror movie through a complex elaboration of materials and research that documents the film. In the exhibition at MACRO, Museum of Contemporary Art of Rome, curated by Elena Forin and extended until March 13th, the spectator is drawn into Hiker Meat, which Shovlin presents through with a series of props, costumes, scripts and trailers that accompanied the release of the film, thus transforming an imagined event into a possibility or perhaps reality.

The film thus reappears today from a forgotten past, taking on new life in the exhibition spaces of the Museum and, more actively, during the course of a live event held in the foyer of Rome’s Teatro Eliseo. On Wednesday February 2, the artist, together with the German rock band Lustfaust, will perform live the score to the film in the tradition of the silent movie piano score, yet with samplers and a typical rock band set-up. The band will also ‘play’ the projection – sampling source material for the making of the film Hiker Meat without showcasing the film itself. Hiker Meat (Rough Cut) will reveal the creation and making of the movie, emerging the spectator in the grotesque and imagined universe of this horror flick.

Hiker Meat and its director Jesus Rinzoli never really existed, nor does the music group Lustfaust, who made the soundtrack and which has been the subject of a preceding series of works by the artist. Shovlin’s project in fact reflects upon the visceral tie between sound and image, emphasized in exploitation cinema by the presence of archetypes and myths, and celebrated by the intense relationship between director and musician, as in the case of Dario Argento and Goblin, or of Lucio Fulci and Fabio Frizzi.

Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Giulia Piscitelli

Rischi minori, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Rischi minori, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Giulia Piscitelli

Untitled, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Giulia Piscitelli

Line, Do Not Cross, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Italsider Io Pallone, 1996

Giulia Piscitelli

Neopolitan Windows, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Neopolitan Windows, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Giulia Piscitelli

Untitled \'95, 1995 (video still)

Giulia Piscitelli

Unter den Linden, 2008 (video still)

Giulia Piscitelli

Scintilla, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Little Italy, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Little Italy, 2010 (detail)

Giulia Piscitelli

Personal Belongings, 2010

Giulia Piscitelli

Artissima, 1995

Giulia Piscitelli

When things cast no shadow, catalogo 5th Berlin Biennial for Contemporary Art, 2008

Giulia Piscitelli

Tornado (il formidabile destriero di Zorro), 2009

Giulia Piscitelli

Quando inseguo la mia ombra, 2009

Giulia Piscitelli, Rischi minori

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Giulia Piscitelli

Plessimetro, 2009 (video still)

Rischi minori

25 January > 2 April 2011

 

The Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea is pleased to present Rischi minori (Minor Risks), Giulia Piscitelli’s first exhibition in Rome and her most comprehensive to date. Curated by Stefano Chiodi, the show includes a vast selection of artworks which testify to one of the most original artistic practices in recent years.

Piscitelli directs an acute and often unpredictable gaze on contemporaneity, through the exploration of both the individual and collective everyday. The artist brings to the fore grotesque and paradoxical traits through a sharp yet melancholic sense of humour coupled with a strong sense of irony. Using a wide range of media, Piscitelli time and again operates with both the objectivity of the ethnologist and the empathetic participation of a privileged witness. The marginal areas of cities and their industrial outskirts become the ideal stage for her research, focusing on a dispersed and confused humanity, on its contradictory vivacity, which with its tics, obsessions and fragmented existential routine appears to incarnate a common condition of today.

The exhibition includes installations, video projections, photography, “paintings”, and works on paper, in which themes dear to the imagination of the artist recur: the contrast between fragility and resistance, the spheres of work and the body, myths of money and power, friction between the political dimension and subjectivity, the intrigue of time and memory. The entirety of Rischi minori includes the complex installation, Protocollo, focused on the trauma of illness “disassembled” to its mental and physical components; a series of work uniforms coated in latex to the point of being transformed into now unusable “objects”; a selection of videos spanning the last two decades in which the artist turns her attention to the domestic sphere and the psychic dimension through images that correspond to devices of re-awareness; mental machines whose task is to make visible traumas and conflicts; concluding with Neopolitan Windows: abstract reconfigurations of windows observed around her home town of Naples. With Rischi minori Giulia Piscitelli offers a comprehensive frame for the complex facets of her work, with all the measure of its force and authenticity.

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, performance, 2010

Print Station avere luogo

Documentation of the performance by Nora Schultz during the realisation of “Print Station avere luogo”, one of the works on display in the exhibition.

Exhibition avere luogo

Exhibition avere luogo

Giuliani Foundation

 

The Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea is a private non-profit foundation dedicated to the advocacy, research and exhibition of contemporary art. It was founded in 2010 by the art collectors Giovanni and Valeria Giuliani, and is under the directorship and curatorial programming of Adrienne Drake.

 

With particular attention attuned to the practices and methodologies of the newest generations of Italian and international artists, the Foundation produces three on-site exhibitions each year. Artists who have never before exhibited in Rome are invited for solo shows, for which the Foundation commissions and produces new artworks, and publishes a catalogue dedicated to the artist to accompany each exhibition. The Foundation also supports and promotes select projects taking place in Rome and abroad.

 

The Fondazione Giuliani is a distinct entity from the Giuliani Collection. However, exhibitions often take the Collection as a key point of departure, to cultivate an examination and interpretation of the very process of collecting. Group exhibitions often cull works from the collection to unveil and underline common threads within the collection itself. The foundation also produces solo shows in which the artists are invited to select and display artworks from the collection, positioned as counterparts or complements to their own practice. Using the collection as archive, resource material and experience, the artists facilitate multiple readings of a single work of art, enriching and expanding the context of display through additional layers of meaning and interpretation.

Nora Schultz

collage, 2010

Nora Schultz, avere luogo

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Nora Schultz, avere luogo

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Nora Schultz, avere luogo

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Nora Schultz, avere luogo

Installation view, photo Gilda Aloisi

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, 2010

Nora Schultz

Print Station avere luogo, 2010

Nora Schultz

Chairs Times I0 & Black Square Times 2, 2010

Nora Schultz

Piece of Tunnel, 2010

Nora Schultz

Frau und Untitled am Strand, 2007 - 2009

Nora Schultz

Turning a Flat Shape Around, 2009

Nora Schultz

Car, 2009; Untitled, 2010

Nora Schultz

X-Tables, 2007

Nora Schultz

Arrow Sculpture, 2007

Nora Schultz

Ergodynamischer Stuhl 3, 2009

Nora Schultz

BMX Path, 2010

Nora Schultz

Untitled (foam mattress I), 2007

Nora Schultz

Model for Underground Airport (After Vantongerloo), 2010

Nora Schultz

Model for a Stage, 2007

Nora Schultz

Collection, 2010

Nora Schultz

Collection, 2010

Nora Schultz

Collection, 2010

avere luogo

11 October > 31 December 2010

 

The Fondazione Giuliani per l’arte contemporanea presents avere luogo (taking place), the first solo show in Italy of German artist Nora Schultz (Frankfurt, 1975).

Metal tubing, foam matting, magnets, rope, stainless steel ramps and plates: the sculptures of Nora Schultz are typically made from found industrial materials, abducted from their original context and re-assembled by the artist with an apparent naturalness, under which lies a dense plot of internal relationships. The materials, fragile remains of contemporaneity undermined by the improvised extraction from their original functionality, manifest a weighted presence when relocated to the exhibition space. This candid materiality imbues the sculptures of Nora Schultz with the immediacy of the moment and makes them, above all else, authentic objects. The spectator is thus drawn into a direct relationship with the objects and is required to consider what constitutes a sculpture? What constitutes an image? And from what is constructed a sculpture’s or image’s cultural identity in the ‘here and now’? Left completely open to infiltrate the surrounding space-time dimension, Schultz’s works define or destabilize the place in which they are situated, while rendering the location itself more evident through the installation.

The term “place”, in explicit contrast to the notion of space, is a central theme of the exhibition. Place implies an actual taking place of something, a movement, an existence that reflects a very precise temporal dimension: the interpretation of sculpture as place and place, in turn, as the “area within an environment which has been altered in such a way as to make the general environment more conspicuous”. This well-known notation by Carl Andre in reference to his sculptures produced by simply positioning units on the floor and their capacity to create place is, together with the postulates of Minimalism, another important reference in the exhibition.

On display at the Fondazione Giuliani is a selection of recent works by Nora Schultz, which both contextualize the artist’s broader practice and that develop a close relationship in the exhibition space with new sculptures and collages produced specifically for avere luogo.

avere luogo is, moreover, the first in a series of solo shows at the Fondazione Giuliani dedicated to Italian and international artists who are invited to examine the internal logic of the collection. However, avere luogo was developed less as a discourse with specific selected artworks, than as an acute reflection on the collection itself as a generating element of place. Intrigued by the intimate rapport that ties a collector to his/her personal collection, Schultz explored the private spaces of the Giuliani Collection to formulate a personal re-reading, and to capture images of the artworks through photographs that both reflect on the actual placement of works in a specific location and also recall the individual movement of the artist in that precise moment.

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

 

Published by Nero
Edition of 1000
2010
Italian/English
15,00€

 

Published in conjunction with the exhibition Mutiny Seemed a Probability, the catalogue includes texts by Adrienne Drake, Antonio Galdo, Mazzino Montinari and Oscar Tuazon, and is designed by artist Wolfgang Berkowski.

 

 

Cesare Pietroiusti

Pensiero Unico, 2003, still da video.

Cesare Pietroiusti

Pensiero Unico, 2003, still da video.

Cesare Pietroiusti

Pensiero Unico, 2003, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Cesare Pietroiusti

22 > 26 june / 7 july / 16 july

Cesare Pietroiusti
Pensiero Unico, 2003, 5’40’’

Ulla Von Brandenburg
5 tableaux vivants, 2004, 12’30’’

Julia Scher
No, I Never Lipsync’d, 2004, 15’36’’

Judith Barry
Casual Shopper, 1980-1981, 6’

Rabih Mrouè
bir-rooh, bid-damm, 2003, 11’

The Atlas Group/walid Raad

I Only Wish that i could Weep, 2000, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Cristina Perrella

15 > 19 june / 6 july / 15 july

/barbaragurrieri/group
11AL9T20, 2009, 3’40’’

Zoulikha Bouabdellah
Croisée, 2005, 5’

Mario Rizzi
Impermanent, 2007, 16’

Jakup Ferri
An Artist Who cannot Speak English is No Artist, 2003, 3’40’’

Sislej Xhafa
Stock Exchange, 2000, 3’01’’

The Atlas Group/Walid Raad
I Only Wish That I Could Weep, 2000, 7’30’’

Gulsun Karamustafa
The Making of the Wall, 2003, 14’

Zoulikha Bouabdellah
La Robe, 2001, 3’

Kuba Bakowski

rough sky riders/rough ver - sky r45 g65 b94/analog generator, 2010, still da video.

Jacek Niegoda

The Dissenter, 1995-2005, still da video.

Jacek Malinowski

Half a Woman, 2000, still da video.

Hieronim Neumann

Blok, 1982, still da video.

Julita Wojcik

Pust\' Wsiegda budiet solnce, 2004, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Ania Jagiello

8 > 12 june / 2 july / 14 july

Kuba Bakowski
rough sky riders/rough ver – sky r45 g65 b94/analog generator, 2010, 2’10’’

Jacek Niegoda
The Dissenter, 1995-2005, 5’

Jacek Malinowski
Half a Woman, 2000, 13’

Hieronim Neumann
Blok, 1982, 5’

Julita Wojcik
Pust’ Wsiegda budiet solnce, 2004, 9’

Manuel Saiz

The Two Teams Team, 2008, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Adrienne Drake

1 > 5 june / 1 july / 13 july

Ra di Martino
Not 360, 2002, 6’

Manuel Saiz
The Two Teams Team, 2008, 10’

Cindy Smith
A Conversation, 2007, 33’

Meris Angioletti
Il Rabdomante, 2006, 13’10’’

Frédéric Moser & Philippe Schwinger
Capitulation Project, 2003, 21’

MOM’s

Scrambled Eggs, 2007, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Francesco Stocchi

18 > 22 May / 29 June / 8 July

Giorgio Andreotta Calò
Volver, 2008, 4’

Haris Epaminonda
Gramophone, 2006, 2’29’’

Elisabeth Mc Alpine
The film footage missed by a viewer through blinking while watching the feature film “Don’t look now”, 2003, 7’17’’

MOM’s
Scrambled Eggs, 2007, 4’44’’

Alek O.
Untitled, 2007, 1’1’’

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Installation view, photo Claudio Abate

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Installation view, photo Claudio Abate

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Installation view, photo Claudio Abate

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Installation view, photo Claudio Abate

Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Installation view, photo Claudio Abate

Mutiny seemed a probability

11 May > 23 July 2010

 

An act of mutiny strives to overthrow a perceived existing authoritarian power. Whether by open rebellion or steady resistance, the imperial control of those in command is at the very least questioned if not radically destabilised.

Some of today’s most extraordinary sculpture demonstrates a similar renouncing of autocratic clout through an opposition to formal hierarchy and a breaking open of aesthetic forms through the use of common humble materials, often coupled with the positioning of sculpture as experience in which its relation to space becomes an integral element to the reading of the work. The undermining of conventional trademarks is further contextualised by a conceptual framework that examines events in politics, history and socio-economic constructs.

The exhibition Mutiny Seemed a Probability underscores these currents in sculptural practice, with a play on materiality, the intrinsic qualities of fragility and instability, and an acute awareness of our current state of ideological precariousness.

Artists Alicja Kwade, Gedi Sibony and Oscar Tuazon explicitly undermine sculpture’s trademarks. In Andere Bedingung (Aggregatzustand 5) Kwade transforms traditional materials into an illusory reduction of form that plays on the materials’ physical qualities in a still-life like composition. Sibony’s use of the most modest of means – cardboard, plexiglass and plastic sheeting – manifests an aggressive ‘almost’ trace of a work, Chatterer, which underscores the potential of materials. And while the work of Sibony brings architectural idiosyncrasies into focus, references to the formal language of architecture are the cornerstone to Oscar Tuazon’s artistic practice. Alluding to the contours of intangible structures, Tuazon’s IT subverts the intended purposes of building materials to defy monumentality, function and practicability. Marco Raparelli’s The Hole more playfully disrupts the notion of stability and solidity of architecture by refusing to stay within the confines of the walls of the exhibition space.

Other artworks engage the viewer through active and sometimes unexpected participation: Esperando el apagòn (Waiting for the blackout), by Jorge Peris, creates a marked level of discomfort triggered by the positioning of the viewer within the work itself. Similarly, the phenomenological characteristics of Micol Assaël’s Elektron intentionally creates unease or downright disturbance. Simon Dybbroe Møller’s sculpture Mass, Weight and Volume (Fallen into Place) references process and scale; elaborated through a game of chance the viewer is then required to physically navigate through the work. Chance, instability and the surreptitious element of performance can also be found in Popcorner by Alessandro Piangiamore; the material elements of the work interact spontaneously, which the public may or may not necessarily be witness to.

In this moment in history ideological reference points are seemingly out of focus and previous benchmarks for understanding and interpreting political positions have become muddled and confused. Rather than a celebration, Manfred Pernice’s Untitled highlights the fact that only twenty years after the collapse of the Berlin Wall its fragments have been fetishised, and the ease with which the wall itself has become a source of commercial souvenirs undermines the grounding of political ideology and symbols of freedom. Leslie Hewitt investigates historical memory in the photographic series Untitled (Horizon Line), Untitled (Connecting), and Untitled (Hours); alluding to 17th century Dutch painting, colonialism and the socio-political framework at play in the economy of objects, Hewitt draws parallels to today offering symbols with which to interrogate culture, politics and economics. The mechanisms of economy are further underlined in Graham Hudson’s The Allegory of Commodity. The work itself is a flexible, modifiable object, installed according to the specifics of location in a propping and balancing of materials that undermine the monetary economy of checks and balances. Nedko Solakov’s The Orientation of the News delineates the inherent confusion in today’s communication spheres. Where national Italian newspapers where once considered subscribed indicators of political positions, their deviance to opposing sides lends itself to disorder and befuddlement. A questioning of power and politics is further underlined in Mona Hatoum’s Drowning Sorrows (wine bottles III). The identity of the exile is at the core of Hatoum’s art; Drowning Sorrows displays the pain of being an exile in a disquieting sculpture that evokes memories of sadness, displacement and the desire to lose oneself in drink. Natascha Sadr Haghighian’s I can’t work like this instead makes an aggressive statement using the void of a laborious process to reflect upon representation, identity and power structures; made with the most basic elements with which to hang art, the work protests against and subverts the ever-increasingly commercial system of the art world.

In the video by Cyprien Gaillard, Real Remnants of Fictive Wars, Part II, the entrance of a decaying 19th century brick tunnel is gradually consumed by a thick cloud of smoke emerging from within the tunnel, juxtapositioning a historical architectural structure with its violent negation within the landscape. Henrik Håkansson instead observes the natural landscape through recording, documentation and archival systems. In The Starlings, Håkansson documents the birds’ coordinated flight formation, a movable sculptural configuration, demonstrating the organised randomness that surrounds us. Finally, Jeff Wall’s A Sapling Held by a Post depicts a young tree in its first stages of growth. While the image calls our attention to the exquisite beauty of nature in all its fragility and vulnerability, it also bears witness to the very precarious state and status of nature.

Corinna Schnitt

Living a Beautiful Life, 2003, still da video.

Videoscreening curated by Anton Vidokle and Julieta Aranda

9 > 15 may / 20 > 23 july

Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla
Returning a Sound, 2004, 5’42’’

Michel Auder
Polaroid Cocaine, 1993, 5′

Wilson Diaz
Los Rebeldes del Sur, 11′

Jakup Ferri
An Artist Who Cannot Speak English is No Artist, 2003, 3’40’’

Jorge Macchi
La Pasion de Juana de Arco, 2003, 10′

Diego Perrone
I Verdi Giorni, 2000, 2’30″

Jozef Robakowski
From my Window, 1978-200, 19′ 20″

Corinna Schnitt
Living a Beautiful Life, 2003, 13′

Superflex
Guaranà Power, 2004, 11’15’’

Micol Assaël

Elecktron, 2007 (photo Claudio Abate)

Simon Dybbroe Møller

Mass, Weight and Volume (Fallen into Place), 2008 (photo Claudio Abate)

Cyprien Gaillard

Real Remnants of Fictive Wars, Part II, 2004 (photo Claudio Abate)

Mona Hatoum

Drowning Sorrows (wine bottles III), 2006 (photo Claudio Abate)

Leslie Hewitt

Untitled (Connecting); Untitled (Horizon Line); Untitled (Hours), 2009 (photo Claudio Abate)

Graham Hudson

Allegory of Commodity, 2008 (photo Claudio Abate)

Alicja Kwade

Andere Bedingung (Aggregatzustand 5), 2009 (photo Claudio Abate)

Jorge Peris

Esperando el apagòn (Waiting for the blackout), 2006 (photo Claudio Abate)

Manfred Pernice

Untitled, 2009 (photo Claudio Abate)

Alessandro Piangiamore

Popcorner, 2006 (photo Claudio Abate)

Marco Raparelli

The Hole, 2008 (photo Claudio Abate)

Natascha Sadr Haghighian

I can’t work like this, 2007 (photo Claudio Abate)

Gedi Sibony

Chatterer, 2007 (photo Claudio Abate)

Nedko Solakov

The Orientation of the News, 2007 (photo Claudio Abate)

Oscar Tuazon

IT, 2009 (photo Claudio Abate)

Jeff Wall

A Sapling Held by a Post, 2000 (photo Claudio Abate)

Exhibition Mutiny Seemed a Probability

Artists

 

Micol Assaël
Elecktron, 2007

Simon Dybbroe Møller
Mass, Weight and Volume (Fallen into Place), 2008

Cyprien Gaillard
Real Remnants of Fictive Wars, Part II, 2004

Mona Hatoum
Drowning Sorrows (wine bottles III), 2006

Leslie Hewitt
Untitled (Connecting), 2009; Untitled (Horizon Line), 2009; Untitled (Hours),2009

Graham Hudson
Allegory of Commodity, 2008

Alicja Kwade
Andere Bedingung (Aggregatzustand 5), 2009

Jorge Peris
Esperando el apagòn (Waiting for the blackout), 2006

Manfred Pernice
Untitled, 2009

Alessandro Piangiamore
Popcorner, 2006

Marco Raparelli
The Hole, 2008

Natascha Sadr Haghighian
I can’t work like this, 2007

Gedi Sibony
Chatterer, 2007

Nedko Solakov
The Orientation of the News, 2007

Oscar Tuazon
IT, 2009

Jeff Wall
A Sapling Held by a Post, 2000

a conversation about e-flux video rental

cura.publishing, Roma, maggio 2010.

a conversation about e-flux video rental

In occasion of the presentation of e-flux video rental in Rome, a special supplement was published about the project by cura.publishing.

In this publication there are two texts, the first by Anton Vidokle and the second by Julieta Aranda, both published in 2005 in EVR catalogue vol.1 and an email conversation held with the artists in the last few months before the opening of the exhibition. An analysis which starts from the conception of the project, touching on its last display, the one in Rome, up to its possible future developments.

Download the introduction text (pdf)
Download the interview with Anton Vidokle and Julieta Aranda (pdf)

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione, particolare

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione, particolare

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione

e-flux video rental, Anton Vidokle & Julieta Aranda

Fondazione Giuliani, Roma, 2010, veduta dell’installazione

e-flux video rental

a project by Anton Vidokle e Julieta Aranda

 

e-flux video rental is an art project conceived by Anton Vidokle and Julieta Aranda, comprising a free video rental, a public screening room, and a film and video archive that is constantly growing.

This collection of almost 950 works of film and video art has been assembled in collaboration with over 130 international artists, curators and critics. Originally started in New York in 2004, at a small storefront space located at 53 Ludlow Street, EVR has been presented in Amsterdam, Berlin, Boston, Frankfurt, Seoul, Istanbul, Canary Islands, Austin Texas, Budapest, Antwerp, Paris, Lyon, and Miami. The project will stop traveling at the end of 2010.

For each of its new locations, EVR expands its inventory to include new selections by local curators / artists / writers. In keeping with this, Frida Carazzato and Maria Garzia, curators in this edition hosted and supported by the Fondazione Giuliani, have invited Adrienne Drake, Ania Jagiello, Cristiana Perrella, Cesare Pietroiusti e Francesco Stocchi to select additional videos for the collection.

In occasion of its presentation in Rome, a special supplement was published about the project, conceived by Frida Carazzato and Maria Garzia in collaboration with cura.magazine.

Hello

 

Published by Nero
Edition of 1000
2012
Italian/English
25,00€

 

The catalogue, published in conjunction with the exhibition by Simon Dybbroe Møller, Hello, includes a special project by the artist and a text by Chris Sharp.